Know Your WW2 Weapons: The German K43 Rifle, Deutschland’s DMR

GERMAN K43 RIFLE: DEUTSCHLAND’S DMR

 

K43 is German shorthand for Karabiner 43. The same weapon was also known as the Gewehr 43. A relatively simple gas-operated design, the K43 was the German answer to our M1 Garand. However, manufacturing pressures and a suboptimal design conspired to keep the K43 from reaching its full potential.

The K43 was an evolutionary development of the previous G41. Produced as the G41(M) from Mauser and the G41(W) from Walther, these two rifles suffered from an inexplicable design mandate that German engineers craft the weapons without drilling a gas port in the barrel. The end result was a gas trap design that was front-heavy, cumbersome, heavy and unreliable. About the time the Wehrmacht was convincing itself that the G41 was a dry hole, they encountered the Soviet SVT-38 and SVT-40 self-loaders in combat on the Eastern Front.

The subsequent G43/K43 featured a more conventional short-stroke piston-driven action with a flapper locking mechanism. Much of this rifle’s entrails seem eerily similar to those of the Soviet SVT-40. This system was easier to manufacture, more reliable and fairly robust. The weapon was semi-auto-only and fed from detachable 10-round box magazines that could also be charged from the top via standard stripper clips.

 

 

 

 

Know Your Obscure WW2 Weapons: The British PIAT Gun

A SINGLE SHOT THAT SAVED D-DAY: THE BRITISH PIAT

 

A Spring Loaded Anti-Tank Gun that you had to Manually Cock to fire and be within 100 yards to be accurate.

Yeah Sounds like a Hoot!

Know Your Weapons: The American Enfield AKA the US Model 1917 Magazine Rifle

The American Enfield AKA the US Model 1917 Magazine Rifle

You can’t go wrong with a Mauser Action in .30-06 Caliber!

 

 

 

 

Know Your Weapons: The Astra 600 – Old School Cool

The Astra 600 – Old School Cool

 

In my 20 or so years collecting I only came across an Astra  600 once, and I passed on it because the guy was way too proud of it and would not budge on the price, primarily because of the German markings.

I regret that now. This model has serious history!

 

 

Know Your Weapons: Nordic Cooperation – The Swedish M96 in Finnish Service

Nordic Cooperation: The Swedish M96 in Finnish Service

 

One of the significant foreign rifles in Finnish service during the Winter War and Continuation War was the Swedish M96 Mauser. These rifles began arriving in Finland even before Finland’s independence, and in 1919 the Civil Guard was given ownership of 1,390 of them. The numbers increased slowly through individual purchases by Finnish sport shooters and Civil Guardsmen in the 1920s, but it was in 1940 that Finland arrange the purchase of a large number. In total, 77,000 more M96 rifles were bought from Sweden during the Winter War, plus about 8,000 more brought and left in Finland by men of the Swedish Volunteer Corps.

About 30,000 of these rifles were returned to Sweden in mid 1940, with the remainder staying in Finnish inventory until the early 1950s. In both the Winter War and Continuation War they saw significant combat service, with the Swedish volunteers, with Finnish forces in northern Finland, and with Costal Infantry and Coastal Artillery units fighting in the south. When they were finally surplussed by Finland in the 50s, they were repurchased by Sweden, overhauled, and put back into service. The Finnish examples found today on the US collector market can be identified by their “SA” Finnish property stamps and (usually) Swedish single-screw stock disks.

9 Hole Reviews Taking the M96 to the 1000-Yard Range:

C&Rsenal History of the Swedish M94 Carbine:

C&Rsenal History of the Swedish M96 Rifle: