Know Your World War II Weapons: The Nebelwerfer Rocket Launcher.

Weapons and Warfare

A diagram of the new Nebelwerfer 150mm ammunition

These rockets were fired from a six-tube launcher mounted on a towed carriage adapted from the 3.7 cm PaK 36 carriage. This system had a maximum range of 6,900 metres (7,500 yd). I am uncertain whether these weapons were used in the Western Desert, but photographs record them in Tunisia, Sicily and Italy, Normandy and the NWE campaign, and of course on the Russian front. Nearly five and a half million 15 cm rockets and six thousand launchers were manufactured over the course of the war.

The 15-cm (5.9-in) German artillery rockets were the mainstay of the large number of German army Nebelwerfer (literally smoke-throwing) units, initially formed to produce smoke screens for various tactical uses but later diverted to use artillery rockets as well. The 15-cm (5.9-in) rockets were extensively tested by the Germans at Kummersdorf West during the late 1930s…

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Japanese Naval Aces and Fighter Units in World War II Book Review

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Japanese Naval Aces and Fighter Units in World War II

By Ikuhiko Hata and Yasuho Izawa, Translated by Don Cyril Gorham

Hardcover in dustjacket, 432 pages, appendices, and index. Illustrated with photographs throughout.

Published by Naval Institute Press November 1989

Language: English

ISBN-10: 0-87021-3156

ISBN-13: 978-0-87021-3151

Dimensions: 7.3 x 1.4 x 10.3 inches

Even today, it is comparatively difficult to find detailed information about Japanese military units in the Second World War. The Pacific Theater was vast, the ocean or jungles swallowed up entire units with their ultimate fates being inferred only after the war by comparison with Allied records. Most original wartime records and photographs were ordered destroyed by the Japanese government, whether officially held or in private collections. This periodically results in the re-discovery of some lost detail of interest of historians and modelers, such as the recent revelation of the shape of the stern of the battleship…

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Know your WW2 History: The revolutionary fuse that won World War II

The revolutionary fuse that helped win World War II

 

Some very interesting reading on a device that helped shorten the war considerably.

Stay Alert, Armed and Dangerous!

 

US Marine MIA for More Than 70 Years on Tarawa Atoll Returned to Home Town from Pacific Atoll

Good Stuff!! 👍

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H/T War History OnLine.

R.I.P. P.F.C. Thomas Frank Johnson, it has been a long road home to your final resting place.

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In three days of intense fighting, more than six and a half thousand American, Japanese and Korean soldiers were killed in the Battle of Tarawa. Many bodies were never found, and a number of victims were marked as MIA, or missing in action.

One of these men, a fallen US Marine called Thomas Frank Johnson, has, at last, been identified and his remains have been repatriated to his hometown of Red Bluff, California, where his relatives still live. Johnson died on the 22nd November 1943, and in a poetic twist was buried almost exactly seventy-seven years later on the 23rd November 2020.

Marine Cemetary on Tarawa
Marine Cemetary on Tarawa

The Battle of Tarawa was the first serious incursion by the American military in the Central Pacific area, taking on a…

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