Know Your WW1 Weapon’s History: The Flammenwerfer

Flammenwefer — World War I German Flamethrowers

 

It appears the first flamethrower of modern design was patented in Germany by Richard Fiedler in 1901. During the same year, the German army funded his continued work on flamethrower designs. Fiedler, a private citizen, designed several flamethrowers models and presented a working product to the German army in 1905. Based on the feedback he received, two versions of the flammenwerfer were delivered to the army in 1908.

Around the same time, a multi-talented man by the name of Bernhard Reddemann began his own experiments in designing flamethrowers. Reddeman was an officer in a German Pioneer battalion until 1903. At that time, he transitioned to a reserve officer and stayed in a Pioneer unit. Pioneers were specialist troops frequently responsible for the demolition of fortifications, engineering strong points and using specialized weapons.

 

 

Know Your WW1 History: American Pravda, Lost Histories of the Great War

American Pravda: Lost Histories of the Great War

 

“On reading this, I did a double-take and almost questioned my sanity. Surely, Hochschild must be aware that exactly at that point in time, the government of Germany had publicly proposed international peace talks without preconditions aimed at ending the war, suggesting that the massive, pointless slaughter be halted, perhaps largely on a status quo ante basis.

The Germans had recently won several huge victories, inflicting enormous losses on the Allies in the Battle of the Somme and also completely knocking Rumania out of the war. So riding high on their military success, they emphasized that they were seeking peace on the basis of their strength rather than from any weakness. Unfortunately, the Allies flatly rejected this peace overture, declaring that that the offer proved Germany was close to defeat, so they were determined to hold out for complete victory with major territorial gains.

As a result, many additional millions needlessly died over the next two years, while just a couple of months later in early 1917 Russia’s Czarist government collapsed, eventually leading to the Bolshevik seizure of power, a turning-point with fateful, long-term consequences.”

 

Know Your WW1 History: Medieval WW1 Trench Weapons

Medieval WWI Trench Weapons

 

The Brutal reality of Close-Quarter Combat in WW1.

 

 

Know Your WW1 History: Steering a Steam Roller – The German Invasion of France in 1914

Steering a Steamroller

 

Bear in mind the German’s did this operation TWICE.

Once in 1914 with infantry and again in 1940 with tanks and infantry (Blitzkrieg) which only took 46 days.

What a difference 26 years makes.

 

 

Know Your Weapons: The American Enfield AKA the US Model 1917 Magazine Rifle

The American Enfield AKA the US Model 1917 Magazine Rifle

You can’t go wrong with a Mauser Action in .30-06 Caliber!