De Havilland DH.98 Mosquito Color Photographs Part II

Beautiful machine.

Part I Photo’s HERE.

Inch High Guy

A beautiful in-flight photograph of a Mosquito B Mk. IV. DK338 was later issued to No. 105 Squadron.

This is NT181, a Mosquito FB Mk. VI assigned to No. 620 Squadron at East Wretham.

NT181 again, from the front. The wear to the spinners and nacelle is interesting and would pose a challenge to the modeler.

Rockets proved especially effective against shipping. The armorers here wear leather jerkins, each man is attired slightly differently.

A Mosquito is “bombed up” with a little canine assistance. Compare the appearance of the bomb fins with that of the bomb bodies.

A South African Air Force FB Mk. VI of No. 60 Squadron photographed at Bari, Italy, September 1944. Note the spinners are different colors.

Another view of the same aircraft, serial number HP968.

One of the more attractive Mosquito schemes is the overall PRU Blue, as seen here worn by PR Mk. XVI…

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Know Your WW2 History: Soviet Drone Tanks

These are the Soviet drone tanks of World War II

 

“Teletanks” were a technological marvel for their time but practicality in war eventually demanded resources go toward building real T-26’s and eventually the Soviet workhorse tank of WW2, the T-34.

This History of Soviet Tanks in World War Two is a fascinating one.

Stay Alert, Armed and Dangerous!

 

Know Your History: Simo Hayha – The White Death

Simo Hayha – The White Death

 

What has always amazed me about Hayha was the MASSIVE amount of kills he was able to rack up (505 confirmed) in such a short period of time (98 days) with a Mosin Nagant with IRON SIGHTS!

For those of you that have shot a Mosin at any distance over a hundred yards, you know what I am talking about!

History has proven time and time again, especially in the Civil War and WW2 that to produce deadly snipers nothing can replace the self-sufficient and practical hunting/gun culture in which they were raised. Their prowess with a rifle was directly related to their survival. Nothing could be a better teacher than that!

Stay Alert, Armed and Dangerous!

 

OKW and OKH

VikingLifeBlog

Adolf Hitler with Wilhelm KeitelFriedrich Paulus and Walther von Brauchitsch, October 1941.

The Oberkommando der Wehrmacht (OKW, “High Command of the Armed Forces”) was the High Command of the Wehrmacht (armed forces) of the German Reich. Created in 1938, the OKW replaced the Reich War Ministry and had nominal oversight over the German Army, the Kriegsmarine (navy), and the Luftwaffe (air force).

Rivalry with the armed services branch commands, mainly with the Army High Command (the OKH), prevented the OKW from becoming a unified German General Staff in an effective chain of command. It did help coordinate operations between the three services. During the war, the OKW, subordinate to Adolf Hitler as Supreme Commander of the Wehrmacht, acquired more and more operational powers. By 1942, OKW had responsibility for all theatres except for the Eastern Front against the Soviet Union. However…

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List of German field marshals (1933–45)

VikingLifeBlog

Hoheitszeichen Kfz Generalfeldmarschall.svg

Before World War II Hitler promoted War Minister Werner von Blomberg (20 April 1936) and Aviation Minister Hermann Göring (4 February 1938) to the rank of Generalfeldmarschall. In the Wehrmacht of  Germany during World War II, the rank of Generalfeldmarschall remained the highest military rank until July 1940, when Hermann Göring was promoted to the newly created higher rank of Reichsmarschall. The equivalent of a Generalfeldmarschall in the navy was Großadmiral (“grand admiral”).

Unlike Kaiser Wilhelm IIAdolf Hitler distributed the rank more widely, promoting 25 Heer and Luftwaffe officers in total and two Kriegsmarine Grand Admirals. (Another promotion, that of Austrian General Eduard von Böhm-Ermolli, was honorary.) Four weeks after the Heer and Luftwaffe had won the Battle of FranceHitler promoted twelve generals to the rank of field marshal on 19 July 1940Walther von BrauchitschWilhelm Keitel

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