Improvised Weapons

Improvised Weapons

 

Collecting and training with Improvised Weapons has always been a keen interest of mine mainly because it keeps my mentality more “fight” focused versus “tool” focused and it also helps me stay armed to some degree in “Non-Permissive” Environments when travelling abroad.

Stay Alert, Armed and Dangerous!

Know Your Weapons: What’s Up With Norway and Military Scout Scopes?

Aside from the German widespread issue of the ZF-41 type scope, I have only come across three other military uses of long eye relief optics – and they are all Norwegian! One is simply Norwegian reuse of surrendered German K98k-ZF41 scopes, including updating them to .30-06 in the 1950s (these were eventually replaced by the…

What’s Up With Norway and Military Scout Scopes? — Forgotten Weapons

How Does It Work: Push Feed vs Controlled Feed

In a controlled feed rifle design, a cartridge slips under the extractor as soon as it is released from the magazine. This means than if the bolt is retracted before being locked into battery, it will pull the cartridge back out as it retracts. On a push feed action, the extractor does not capture the…

How Does It Work: Push Feed vs Controlled Feed — Forgotten Weapons

The Webley Mk.1- Going Strong 130 Years Later.

Beautiful British Wheel gun with some amazing service history in the man stopping caliber of .45 ACP. What more do you need?

Stay Alert, Armed and Dangerous!

Tinker Talks Guns

The Webley company has roots extending into the 18th Century, and changed names a few times over the years. Initially a maker of bespoke firearms of a variety of sorts, they dipped their toes into the emerging revolver market in 1853 with the percussion ‘longspur’ revolver.

This was a very high-quality, hand-made weapon. Webley had hoped for an Army contract, but in the end they could not compete with Adams mass-produced pistols, which were less expensive and could more easily be produced in the numbers required.

In the 1860s they produced a solid-frame, double-action revolver, and in 1868 a variant of this was purchased by the British government for the Royal Irish Constabulary, causing the model to be named the RIC. A few years later they made a more compact version of the RIC called the Bulldog, and these became one of the most widely copied handguns of the 19th…

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