The Folly of Gun Control in Brazil

Where there is a WILL there is a WAY.
Never under estimate men who want to be armed.
This is a snapshot of FUSA in under 10 years.

After Balkanization is complete, hundreds of skilled armorers will begin churning out QUALITY Weaponry despite the Federal Govt.’s aim to “CONTROL” it.

Are you Prepared to be an “Outlaw” when it comes to your Second Amendment Rights?

 

“Before all Else, Be Armed.” -Machiavelli

Impro Guns

The local gang armorers are pumping these things out in ever increasing numbers from a few dollars worth of scrap pipe and the authorities are helpless to stop it.

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.44 Magnum Concealed Carry

.44 Magnum Concealed Carry

 

“Carry the biggest gun you can tote comfortably and shoot accurately. The reason being is if it is not Comfortable you will leave it at home in the gun safe instead of having it in your pants when you need it and if you can’t shoot it accurately, well, what are we really talking about carrying a gun for?” –Clint Smith, Thunder Ranch.

 

It all comes down to manual of arms and PRACTICE.

Yeah six rounds of .44 Mag should do the trick against any foe, two or four legged.

IF you can put the rounds where you need them to be ACCURATELY under STRESS.

 

Know Your WW2 History: Axis vs AA Guns

AXIS VS. AA GUNS: HISTORY OF AMERICAN ANTI-AIRCRAFT WEAPONS

 

Even from the first moments of America’s sudden involvement in World War II, U.S. anti-aircraft (AA) gunners were in the thick of the fight. John W. Finn, US Navy Chief Aviation Ordnanceman, won the Medal of Honor during the Japanese attacks on Pearl Harbor, December 7, 1941.

As Japanese planes attacked his post at Naval Air Station Kaneohe Bay, he fought back from an exposed .50 caliber machine gun stand. He hammered away at the strafing and bombing Japanese aircraft.

 

Know Your Weapons: Mannlicher M1895 Rifle

AUSTRIA-HUNGARY’S M-95 Rifle

 

“The M95 proved itself one of the finest battle rifles of the First World War. It weighed around a pound less than its equally lengthy peers and was slim and almost delicate by comparison. The soldiers who carried it appreciated its light weight but the Allied soldiers facing the M95 in the icy Alps and trenches took note of its high rate of fire compared to their turn-bolt action guns. The M95 was capable of 30–35 rounds a minute while turn-bolt actions were generally limited to 15–20 shots a minute. The simplicity of the straight-pull’s forward-backward bolt operation certainly made it easier to master than a turn-bolt action, which requires twice the number of motions to cycle. In addition, the upward motion to lift a cock-on-opening bolt handle — for example the Lebel, Berthier, M1903 Springfield, Carcano — is physically more difficult and more disruptive to the aim. The British SMLE, which cocked on the forward stroke like the Mannlicher, was the M95’s closest rival in speed of operation.”