The Bad Ass Files: Michael Thornton, US Navy

Petty Officer Michael Thornton: Quite Possibly the Baddest Man in the Entire World

 

This man is so bad that in the words of Gunnery Sgt. Highway (Heartbreak Ridge):

“He can eat concertina wire and piss napalm and put a round through a fleas ass at 200 meters.”

Stay Alert, Armed and Dangerous!

Inside Air America: The CIA’s Secret Airline

Supplying guerrilla bases deep in the highlands behind the lines. An older but awesome documentary on the little known story of Air America. Good stuff. -NCS

via Inside Air America: The CIA’s Secret Airline — American Partisan

John Stryker Meyer and MAC-V-SOG

Not long ago I read John L. Plaster’s amazing book Secret Commandos: Behind Enemy Lines with the Elite Warrior’s of SOG.

Then as I was perusing Jocko Willink’s podcast the other day I ran across three episodes Jocko did with John Stryker Meyer, another member of that elite unit, MAC-V-SOG that served in Vietnam.

I highly urge you to listen to all three of these podcast, the stories and lessons are AMAZING.

 

 

 

Guerilla Warfare History: Interviews with Hackworth and Giap

These are two interview transcripts I found on PBS from a 20th Century Historical Timeline Documentary

One is with Colonel David Hackworth, United States Army Retired and the author of About Face.

The other interview is with  Vo Nguyen Giap, a Viet-Minh General.

Guerilla Warfare History is of extreme importance to the Civilian Operator. BOLO for more articles like this soon.

 

Interview with Col. David Hackworth
U.S. Army, South Vietnam

 

Interview with Vo Nguyen Giap
Viet Minh Commander

 

Stay Alert, Stay Armed and Stay Dangerous!

Psy-Ops Military History Files: The True Story of ‘Commando Buzz’

 EC-121S propaganda plane. Air Force photos

EC-121S propaganda plane. Air Force photos

 

On Dec. 24, 1970, an odd airplane touched down at an air base in Thailand. Though it might not have looked like it, this was a top secret U.S. Air Force propaganda plane and the crew had just flown the last of a series of classified missions over neighboring Cambodia.

The Pentagon sent the pilots from the Pennsylvania Air National Guard to help the government in Phnom Penh spread propaganda in remote, rural areas. Though brief, the obscure operation — nicknamed Commando Buzz — paved the way for an all new kind of psychological warfare operation.

By 1970, Washington had been fighting a broad and bloody war in Southeast Asia for nearly five years. North Vietnamese troops funneled weapons, ammunition and other gear through Laos and Cambodia into South Vietnam.

A seemingly endless stream of ideas, from the practical to the absurd andsometimes terrifying, had all failed to cut the communist supply lines. In Laos, with the help of a friendly government, the Pentagon and the Central Intelligence Agency launched a covert bombing campaign and backed a secretive guerrilla army on the ground.

But Cambodia leader Norodom Sihanouk refused to break ties with the Soviet Union and Communist China. An avowed neutralist and supporter of the non-aligned movement, Sihanouk tried to play off all the sides of his advantage.

Ultimately, he found himself surrounded by enemies. Sihanouk coined the French term “Khmer Rouge” — Red Khmers — for his leftist opponents. He similarly derided right-leaning critics as the “Khmer Bleu.”

In March 1970, military officers led by Gen. Lon Nol seized control as Sihanouk was on a world tour of Europe, the Soviet Union and China. Lon and his compatriots believed he gave the North Vietnamese too much freedom and empowered Pol Pot’s Khmer Rouge.

The junta rushed to Washington for help. A month after the coup, American and South Vietnamese troops launched an attack into Cambodian territory. In July 1970, the campaign ended after delivering a major blow to Hanoi’s forces.

Unfortunately, Lon’s government couldn’t capitalize on the victory. The U.S.-led offensive drove the communists deeper into the Cambodian countryside, where they could count on popular support.

The Cambodian military, with its poorly-trained and underpaid soldiers, was also no match for the battle-hardened rebels without American aid.

 Read the Remainder at War is Boring