Urban Combat: Watch out for Ricochets

 

With the uptick in urban gun play recently by armed felons and assorted morons the martial civilian needs to be aware of the high probability of ricochets regardless if you think you are in a “safe” place or at a “safe” distance.

High powered handguns and rifles and large amounts of asphalt and brick and metal are a bad mix. The cameraman had the right ideal of getting behind a vehicle for cover but if possible get behind the engine block. A big hunk of steel beats a few thin layers of sheet metal, aluminum and plastic any day of the week.

The shooting above occurred in Atlanta at one of the many protest/memorials recently.

The very distinct ‘zing’ of the ricochet and the proceeding hysteria happens around :40.

As a Side Note, Be Self-Sufficient and Know Basic First Aid and Trauma Care!

Stay Alert, Armed and Dangerous!

Roof Koreans: How Civilians Defended Koreatown from Racist Violence During the 1992 LA Riots

This timely article comes by way of site sponsor Ammo.com and written by my buddy over there Sam Jacobs. You don’t have enough ammo for what’s coming down the pipe- hit up Ammo.com and get squared away. The riots of the spring of 2020 are far from without precedent in the United States. Indeed, they…

Roof Koreans: How Civilians Defended Koreatown from Racist Violence During the 1992 LA Riots — American Partisan

Quick Thinking by Kansas Soldier ends Active Shooter Rampage

Kansas soldier saves ‘countless lives’ by driving truck into active shooter: reports

 

Kudos go out to this brave soldier whose quick thinking saved lives!

It reminds me of a couple of articles I posted some time back about Dealing with Mob Attacks on your Vehicle and the legality Using your Vehicle as a Weapon.

In this day and age we spend more time in our vehicles than ever before and when rioting, looting and general mayhem (like Active Shooters) seem to be common place, the Armed Civilian has to be ready to defend himself and his loved ones by any means necessary and sometimes that may mean using that 2 ton hunk of steel and plastic you are riding in to flatten the assholes trying to harm you!

Stay Alert, Armed and Dangerous!

 

Armed Citizen Corner: Is it Legal to Use Your Vehicle As A Weapon When Confronted With Rioters?

Protesters climb atop a car stopped in traffic as a crowd marches near the venue where Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump was speaking during a rally in San Jose, California on June 2, 2016. Protesters who oppose Donald Trump scuffled with his supporters on June 2 as the presumptive Republican presidential nominee held a rally in California, with fistfights erupting and one supporter hit with an egg. / AFP / JOSH EDELSON (Photo credit should read JOSH EDELSON/AFP/Getty Images)

Analysis: Is it Lawful Self-Defense to “Run Down” Rioters Surrounding Your Vehicle?

(click on above link to be re-directed to source page)

 

A great topic to cover seeing how race riots may be visiting towns and cities across this Nation very soon.

Bottom line, if possible, get the incident on video. Cops, judges and juries LOVE video.

I had a friend who went through a similar situation a while back.

Drunk college kids were celebrating downtown after a Basketball game. The celebration turned into a full-scale looting riot and the Police were caught off-guard. My friend was just trying to get back home after going to the market to get pampers for his new baby. Several kids blocked the road and refused to move and then some started throwing beer bottles against his car. My friend started filming the whole thing with his cell phone. After a couple of minutes he started being in fear for his life when a larger crowd appeared and started rocking his car back and forth trying to tip it over.

At that moment, self-preservation kicked into high gear. He accelerated through the crowd blocking his path, running over a total of 4 to 5 people. Of course the idiots got his plate number and called the cops. My fiend in turn also filed charges.

Long story short, with a good lawyer armed with that cell phone footage, charges against my friend were dismissed by a judge. The judge said “That any reasonable person would do the same to protect their life when surrounded by inebriated hooligans…these idiots got off easy with JUST broken bones.”

From my friend’s cell phone video combined with Street CCTV, they were able to Prosecute around 15 people. They went after the four that were attacking my friend’s car with Felony Assault Charges and last I heard from my friend, they all got convicted.

My buddy’s lawyer later said that without the cell phone footage the case may not have went as well… but him recording it showed responsibility and rational thinking to the judge.

Food for thought gents.

 

Stay Alert, Stay Armed and Stay Dangerous!

Urban Warfare, Back in the Day

URBAN WARFARE, BACK IN THE DAY

Current headlines are replete with stories of urban warfare. Be it Aleppo, Ramadi, Tripoli or some Ukrainian city you only learned of last year, there appears to be no shortage of combatants that want to fight in/over/for some piece of urban terrain. Perhaps a brief step back in to the history of urban warfare will generate some useful perspective.

On the Western Front in 1944, the August Allied sprint across France had quickly slowed to a methodical advance in September, in part because the Allied logistical system could not keep up. Part of that advance included the assault on Aachen, just across the German border and the first German city to fall on either the Eastern or Western Fronts.

A recovered Wehrmacht was putting up fierce resistance by October 1944 and most American forces were needed to hold the line. Only two infantry battalions from the 26th Infantry Regiment (1st Infantry Division) were available for the assault itself. American commanders did what came naturally: They substituted machines for men and emphasized firepower, heavily reinforcing the two infantry battalions with artillery, engineers, air support, and most importantly armor. M4 Shermans and M10 tank destroyers were integrated with the infantry down to the small-unit level, sometimes a single vehicle with a squad. Senior commanders even went as far as to assign each battalion an M12 self-propelled 155mm gun (not a howitzer) — a corps-level asset.

Two items can help us connect back to that time. The first is a rare photo of an M4 Sherman tank and an M10 tank destroyer together on the battlefield as they worked together in Aachen during the assault (below). The U.S. Army Signal Corps photo was probably never published, but can be found among the holdings of the National Archives and Records Administration. The second item is an account of the battle from one of the infantry battalion commanders that took the city, Lt. Col. Derrill Daniel. The Capture of Aachen was written by Daniel for a course he was taking at the Army’s Command and Staff College (Ft. Leavenworth) in the late 1940s. For both current and future historians, the digitization of old military school papers is a rich vein of primary sources, where one can read accounts of those who were there, but written when they had the time to do so without dodging incoming artillery.

The two battalions methodically advanced across the city, halting each night, employing firepower extensively and assuming every building was a German strongpoint until proven otherwise. It took 10 days to clear the city, and the two battalions suffered nearly 500 casualties (approximately 30 percent of authorized strength), but it was an impressive feat considering they were outnumbered 3 to 1 by the 5,000 German defenders.

In addition to the emphasis on machines and firepower, another American trait was key at Aachen — adaptability. U.S. forces had little experience in urban warfare to this point in the war. There was U.S. Army doctrine on urban warfare at that time (FM 31-50), but it had just come out in January 1944. While that doctrine got many things right, it was patently wrong about the role of armor in urban warfare, describing it as only occasionally useful when dealing with some enemy strongpoints. The Americans at Aachen had learned in the hedgerow country of Normandy that armor and infantry that wasn’t joined at the hip was critically vulnerable.

The designs of the M4 Sherman and M10 tank destroyer form an interesting subplot to the story of Aachen. The much-maligned Sherman did fare poorly against the more advanced German designs (e.g., Panther) in open terrain, but in a close-range urban fight supporting the infantry it was in its element — no coincidence considering the Army’s infantry branch had designed it for infantry support. In contrast, the M10 was designed to deal with enemy tanks, with little thought to combined arms. And yet, a role for the M10 was found as well. Its high-velocity 3-inch (76mm) gun worked better against targets with particularly thick walls, and the close cooperation with the infantry mitigated the vulnerabilities from its roofless turret.

The adaptability demonstrated by the American soldiers at Aachen can be traced back through many field manuals. The Field Service Regulations of 1923, for example, stated the expectation for men of all ranks to “show initiative in meeting different situations as they arise.” But one can argue that adaptability wasn’t so much a trait of the American military but American culture writ large. The American meritocracy has long given the freedom to innovate to a broad base of individuals.

As one ponders the many ongoing conflicts in urban terrain, consider the past. While factors such as equipment and force ratios certainly matter, less obvious elements such as a culture of innovation can also play a key role.