Med Corner: The Basics of IV Fluids for Emergency Scenarios

THE BASICS OF IV FLUIDS FOR EMERGENCY SCENARIOS

 

Disclaimer: This is meant to be a brief overview and not a detailed guide on IVs. Please seek qualified medical training before attempting any of these steps. 

 

If you are not budgeting for Annual Training from Reputable Folks in Civilian Field/Trauma Medical you are cutting yourself way short.

 

Stuck Pig Medical

Lone Star Medics

 

Hidden In Plain Sight: Camouflage & Movement From A USMC Scout Sniper

Hidden In Plain Sight: Camouflage & Movement From A USMC Scout Sniper

 

An important concept is to stop, look, listen, smell, and plan (SLLSP). When moving across long distances, the environment can cause you fatigue, taking away your stealthies. Conduct an SLLSP. Stop all movement. Look around the area. Listen to your surroundings. Smell the environment. Plan your route. The focus of SLLSP is to keep you in tune with your surroundings and to get your bearings while moving with camouflage. You must be slow and deliberate. 

 

 

 

Training Should Always Reveal Flaws

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More on Rifles

 

When we train, regardless if it is with tools (firearms, knives, sticks) or not, our training should reveal our flaws; either in actual technique, our mentality or our gear.

Revealing flaws in our gear and how we “load out” with our rigs to fight is something I can tell you from experience can not only make your life easier but also be LIFE SAVING.

In training with your rifle load out, ask yourself these questions:

  • Does my rig allow me to move quickly?

  • Does my rig allow me to reload quickly?

  • Is my rig relatively “quiet” or do I sound like a coke can filled with rocks when I move?

  • Is my rig “flexible” in all fighting Positions? (ie sitting, prone, one knee)

  • Does my rig hinder my ability to take cover?

  • Can I access my trauma/med kit quickly and easily?

The part about “Military Costume Play” is so true.

So often guys buy gear and dress themselves up and their firearms not from a practical fighting perspective, but because they are trying to look like the latest tacti-cool douchebag on the cover of Soldier of Fortune.

Remove your head from your ass and get PRACTI-COOL, NOT TACTI-COOL in your Training!

Stay Alert, Armed and Dangerous!

 

Rifleman Training Twofer from Von Steuben

Rates of Fire for the Rifleman

 

Reed and Heed.

“Weapons employment and squad firepower are not determined by how fast Marines can fire their weapons but how fast they can fire accurately.

So how does this translate into practice? Simple; the rifleman’s rate of fire is as quickly as he can aim down his sights, squeeze off an accurate shot, acquire another sight picture, and squeeze off another accurate shot. That’s all you need to remember. This technique naturally adjusts the rate of fire to different ranges. It will take you longer to line up a shot at greater ranges, which means that your rate of fire at greater ranges is decreased. Conversely, your rate of fire increases as the distance to your target decreases.

 

Priorities of Purchase; Progressively Building a Rifleman’s Kit on a Budget

 

The Cornerstone for a Small Partisan Unit to be effective is this:

Every Man a Rifleman, FIRST AND FOREMOST!

Think Practical, not Tactical and Get Your Kit Built Today!

 

 

AL TARMIYAH FIREFIGHT!: Lessons Learned The Hard Way

AL TARMIYAH FIREFIGHT!: Lessons Learned The Hard Way

Excellent article about Practical Combat Rifle Skills we need to keep sharp as civilians:

 

  • Assuming I killed the bad guy with one shot to the torso area

  • Performing a slow reload

  • Retaining my empty magazine during the middle of such an intense firefight

  • Stowing an empty magazine in the same location as my fresh magazines

  • Looking down at my weapon while reloading

  • Having my rifle in the Low Ready while reloading

  • Standing bladed and not taking advantage of my ballistic plates