Survival 101: Upgrade Your Primitive Skills

 

Get back in touch with your primitive side!

Be sure and follow/subscribe to this guys WordPress blog guys, some really good stuff there.

 

Stay Alert, Stay Armed and Stay Dangerous!

 

Prepping 101: Bugging Out on Foot

bug-out

Tactical Walking Tips For Bugging Out On Foot

(click on above link to be re-directed)

Some tactical security considerations for Bugging out on foot.

The only thing I would re-emphasize is regardless if you are alone or travelling in a group, always maintain 360 Degree Security when walking. This means constantly scanning behind you.

Stay Alert, Stay Armed and Stay Dangerous!

Survival Tips: 18 Macgyver Like Survival Hacks

mac1header

Editor’s note: The following tips are excerpted from Survival Hacks: Over 200 Ways to Use Everyday Items for Wilderness Survival by Creek Stewart.

Having taught survival skills to thousands of individuals from all over the world for nearly two decades, I’ve come to one conclusion: the most important survival skill is innovation. Using what you have, to get what you need is what will ultimately make the difference between life and death in a sudden and unexpected survival scenario. I often call this “survival hacking.”

Over the years, I’ve learned (and sometimes invented) some very interesting survival hacks that I think everyone should know. Why? Well, it’s like I always say: “it’s not IF but WHEN.” Below are a few survival nuggets for the when.

Framework Collar Connector

template

If you need a long pole, you’ll often have to lash together two limbs or saplings to get the right length. This is the case when making a dome framework for wigwam-style shelters, for example. If cordage is in short supply, using an energy shot bottle (like a 5-Hour Energy or similar product) from your trash may be the solution. After slicing off the top and bottom of the bottle, a very strong cylindrical tube remains. You can use this tube as a collar for connecting the ends of two limbs. Taper the ends of the limbs so they slide into the tube opposite each other and form a snug fit when wedged together. This collar will hold them surprisingly well and will not stretch with moisture, as many lashings do. If the collar is a bit loose, heat it over coals or a flame and it will shrink and tighten the fit.

Blanket Chair

template

Finding a good place to sit in an improvised survival camp can be very frustrating — especially when the ground is wet or snow covered. This hack improvises a very comfortable seat in just a few minutes. The only parts you need are four sturdy poles and a blanket or scrap piece of durable fabric. Cut three poles that are 6′-8′ long by 1″-2″ thick, and then cut a fourth that is the same thickness and 4′ long.

Connect two of the long poles together at one end using a bipod lashing. Fold the blanket or fabric in half, bunch the end together, and suspend this end with rope from the cross at the bipod lashing. Insert the 4′ pole in the unsecured fold of the blanket so that it sticks out at both ends, and rest it against the longer poles. Finally, kick lash the last long pole in the center as a support and lean back to relax.

Condom Canteen

template

Many survivalists, including myself, suggest packing non-lubricated condoms in survival kits. They are small, compact, and inexpensive, and have a plethora of survival uses. One noteworthy function is a compact emergency water container. Here are a couple tips I’ve learned from experience for using a condom as a canteen:

  • Fill the condom in a sock to protect it during travel.
  • Use any rigid hollow tube such as an ink pen, elderberry branch, or bamboo section as a spout and secure the base of the condom around it using duct tape or paracord.
  • Carve a spout stopper from any dry branch.
  • Add a sling, and you’re ready to make tracks with more than a liter of drinking water. 

 

Read the Remainder at Art of Manliness

Practical Skill-Sets: How to Remove Your Own Stitches

Watch former Special Forces operator Jeff Kirkham skilfully remove sutures from the face of MMA’s Josh Tyler.

Sometimes being a man means getting punched or kicked in the face. If you find this keeps happening, you can either reevaluate your life choices, or learn how to cut your recovery time short like a boss.

If you opt for the latter, check out this video by Man Hacks in which Mixed Martial Arts fighter Josh Tyler has his stitches removed by a former Green Beret after getting kicked in the face.

Run by combat veterans Logan Stark, a former Marine Corps scout sniper, and Jeff Kirkham, who served 28 years in the Army Green Berets, Man Hacks is devoted to “reviving the art of man skills.”

Every week, Man Hacks releases a different video demonstrating how to do something manly, like escape from handcuffs or duct tape if you keep finding yourself getting tied down for some reason. Check out their Facebook page here.

So, if a doctor’s office is too much of a hassle, here you go.

Stay Alert, Stay Armed and Stay Dangerous!

Technology Dependent and Useless……..

dr.1

 

It can be stated categorically that over-reliance on any one thing is BAD.  This point was reinforced and qualified for me when I heard a story about the military brass in the Pentagon getting report after report about new line officer’s (the combat platoon leaders in the field) when stripped of all “electronic gadgets” could not do the most basic of field skills associated with their jobs. Examples included Infantry officers unable to use a map and compass to get their platoon from point A to point B, when the batteries on their GPS unit dies. Another was about artillery officers unable to calculate firing solutions because they lacked the fundamental math skills when their laptops with the applicable software gets “fried” by an EMP blast. In the words of cold war strategist George Kennan: “It is frightening to think the one thing that could possibly send the world into oblivion is one certain power cord jerked from one certain electrical socket at the precise time….”


As a veteran, of course all of this concerned me. But after some reflection, I came to the conclusion that this was a two-fold issue. The first issue is of balance, or rather, imbalance. You see, Technology CAN be a good thing, if it is assimilated within a society or organization (like the military) with a degree of understanding. That understanding being, that TECHNOLOGY is just another TOOL to help us, it is not a replacement for anything, most especially the skill in which you are using the tool for. Example: We use calculators everyday to do math problems quickly. That long multiplication or division or finding the square root of a number is time-consuming if done with pencil and paper, so the TOOL (calculator) helps us with that. It would be idiotic for math teachers to just hand out calculators to their students, explain how to operate them and send them out into the world without first teaching MATH, correct? If that was the case, the student would only be as good as his TOOL! Take that away, and you destroy the usefulness of the students capacity to effect his environment. The same analogy goes for the soldier, but in the soldiers case, it is a much more serious issue, because now we are talking about issues of life and death, both for the individual and for the country in which he is fighting to defend.

The second issue is that of mindset. The fact that fundamental skill’s are not being taught as just that: FUNDAMENTAL but rather as a CONTINGENCY in the event the TOOL breaks down is a prime example of putting “the cart before the horse”. Using the example of being able to use a map and compass properly to navigate should not be an afterthought simple because we live in the era of the $100 GPS unit! This backwards way of thinking has to be done away with if things are to move forward.

This is a wake up call for the CO. “Over reliance” on any type of technology is a weakness, period. Notice I did not say “Reliance” on any kind of technology. As CO’s, Using technology to our advantage for self-defense and survival is a no-brainer. It is when we get to the point that we forget the skill that the technology is helping us with that we get into trouble!

A short list of examples would include:

  • Relying too heavily on rangefinders, without knowing how to calculate distance by old fashioned methods.
  • Letting “smart scopes” do all the work without knowing how to use Mil’s to calculate holds
  • Over-reliance on a GPS without knowing how to use a map and compass
  • Not teaching fundamental marksmanship skills with iron sights because of over use of red dot sights
  • Not knowing how to make a fire without a lighter. This may seem a bit far fetched, but when you think about it, this is the most basic of ALL survival skills!

The only way that we don’t forget those skills is that we keep them alive and teach them to the next generation, and they repeat the cycle, etc.

Our goal, as the Goal of all of America, must be to never allow our enemies to say about us:

“They are Technology Dependent and as Useless as the Tits on a Boar Hog……..”

Stay Armed, Teach the Fundamentals and Stay Dangerous!

%d bloggers like this: