Testing Yourself

Tactical Wisdom

Ragnar the Insurrectionist

I’m a big fan of the Vikings TV Series. Yes, I know it’s not 100% historically accurate, but that doesn’t mean there isn’t some Tactical Wisdom in it. In fact, the plot line from Season 1 is very instructive for the moment we find ourselves in and can guide you in getting ready.

Ragnar had defied Earl Haraldson and the Earl ordered surveillance on Ragnar and his war-band (sounds like the government watching a militia group, doesn’t it?). In fact, the Earl went so far as to insert an informant into Ragnar’s crew, Knut. Sounds pretty familiar. Well, the first lesson is that Ragnar assigned people to keep watch on the informant to limit the information he could gather and the damage he could do.

But the part that relates most to this article is that after Ragnar and his band fought off an attack by the…

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Combined Arms for the Minuteman

Von Steuben Training & Consulting

The term “combined arms” conjures up images of tanks advancing with aircraft screaming overhead and infantry charging in front. While this is one modern, conventional form of a combined arms technique, it is far from the only one. And just because the modern Minuteman has limited types of arms available does not mean that he cannot still adopt a combined arms approach to combat. All that is required is a little creativity, knowledge, and the proper training.

Let’s start with the definition of “combined arms” as defined by the US Army publication ADRP 3-0 Unified Land Operations.

“Combined arms is the synchronized and simultaneous application of arms to achieve an effect greater than if each arm was used separately or sequentially.”

In this sense, the term “arms” means any form of weapon, combat vehicle, or unit. On a large scale your “arms” could be an infantry regiment and a fighter…

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The Tank is not Obsolete and Other Observations about the Future of Combat

The Tank is not Obsolete and Other Observations about the Future of Combat

 

“The available data from Ukraine, as well as the recent war in Nagorno-Karabakh, indicate that tanks are still critical in modern warfare and their vulnerabilities have been exaggerated. Russia’s heavy tank losses can be explained by employment mistakes, poor planning and preparation, insufficient infantry support, and Ukrainian artillery. The use of Javelins and other light anti-tank systems in Ukraine has not demonstrated that the tank is obsolete any more than the Sagger anti-tank guided missile did in the 1973 Yom Kippur War, as discussed by David Johnson in these pages.”

 

 

Reference Library: 150 Questions for a Guerilla

H/T WRSA

 

 

Alberto Bayo y Giroud was a Cuban-born officer who fought in the civil war in Spain and the revolution in Cuba.

He was responsible for training the small cadre that would land on the island in 1956 and which included Ernesto Guevara and the Castro brothers. This volume is drawn from his experience gained over the years of fighting that would topple the Batista regime, as well as lessons he learned during his famous marine assault on Majorca in 1936. It is a culmination of a lifetime of combat leadership. This book is a product of the post-revolutionary period in Cuba, during which the fledgling state attempted to export their uprising to the rest of Latin America. It was intended as a practical guide for those interested in starting their own guerrilla units, detailing the organization of such a group and the first offensive actions that should be taken against the state. We believe books that exist only for “historical interest” are bourgeois trivialities, and so we’ve taken the liberty of re-writing certain sections of this work in order to provide an updated picture. We hope to preserve its practical function as a guerrilla guidebook, as well as to present an accessible version free of the typos and translation errors that characterize other free copies.

Download your Free Copy HERE.

 

 

Attack on Poland – German and Soviet Rearmament

Know Your History.

History and War

Introduction

Throughout history, Poland shared the fate of many Central European nations in being a playground of various great powers. While Poland had, through Middle Ages and especially in 16th to 18th centuries, achieved status of a great or at least regional power, it always had to fight to preserve its independence. Poland eventually disappeared from the map after being divided between Prussia, Austria and Russia in divisions of 1772., 1793. and 1795. Poland would – with the exception of short-lived Grand Duchy of Warshaw – only regain independence after the three empires collapsed following the First World War.

As Russia collapsed in the 1917. revolution, the new Provisional Government in Petrograd issued a proclamation of Polish independence on 31st March 1917. But Germans had occupied Poland in its entirety, and so independence had to wait. Only in Autumn of 1918., with defeat of Germany close at…

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