The Five Worst Guns for Self-Defense

The Five Worst Guns for Self-Defense

Some practical common sense advice.

If you are going to carry a gun to protect your life and the life of your loved one’s, don’t be a cheap idiot: spend the money for a quality firearm and some quality training!

 

Dr. William Aprill’s “Unthinkable” Presentation

 

This guy has a wealth of knowledge about Criminal Behavior, Criminal Awareness and Not Becoming a Victim!

Trust me this is an hour well spent.

Prepare Accordingly!

Team Training Ideas

I like this Blog. Practical with NO BS.

I recommend all my readers bookmark it.

Tactical Wisdom

Whenever existing prepper groups train as a group, one of two things happen. They either spend the entire weekend shooting and doing unrealistic tactics like practicing urban combat, or it just becomes a family camping trip, where a good time is had, but no actual training occurs.

As the law & order situation in the US continues to deteriorate at an increasing rate, you and your team can’t afford to waste valuable training time with unfocused training or training on things that actually won’t be used. Let’s begin there.

Let’s talk first about things we WON’T actually be doing:

  1. Conducting building clearing: While this is always fun training, it’s not very practical from a preparedness standpoint. Your objective is DEFENSE, not OFFENSE. If you need to force entry to one of your own buildings and re-take it, you’ve already lost and it’s time to move.
  2. Doing “camp-out” things: If you…

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Restraint Escape Carry: 16 Ways To Go Undetected

Restraint Escape Carry: 16 Ways To Go Undetected

 

This is one of those areas of training that most folks totally neglect but when you do the math on the odds of the average joe citizen becoming illegally detained in the 21st century cancel culture you will quickly see this is an area of training you need to focus on NOW!

Buy the gear NOW! Learn to use it NOW!

The Life you SAVE May be your Own!

 

Combative Corollaries

combatives3

The following is taken directly from the Afterword in Kelly Mccann’s Outstanding book Combatives for Street Survival.

In this afterword, Kelly draws corollaries between what is taught in the USMC Field Manual (FM 1) Warfighting and what is experienced in personal combat using Combatives for self-defense. Kelly divides these corollaries into Several distinct sections: War, Friction, Uncertainty, Fluidity, Disorder, The Human Factor & Violence and Danger.

WAR

FM 1: “It is critical to keep in mind that the enemy is not an inanimate object to be acted upon but an independent and animate force with its own objectives and plans.”

Combative Corollary: Always Train with an ACTIVE partner and not someone who is robotic or remains fixed in place while you execute a technique. Never allow the use of staged pillar assaults to support your technique. Encourage your partner to move and act freely, because your attacker will.

FRICTION

FM 1: “Friction is the force that resist all action and saps energy.”

Combative Corollary: Fighting for your life saps your strength MUCH MORE quickly than training or competition. Be Aware of this fact.

FM 1: “Friction may be mental, as in indecision over a course of action.”

Combative Corollary: Don’t learn too many alternative techniques because it will only result in indecisiveness under duress and INCREASE reaction time. See HICKS LAW.

UNCERTAINTY

FM 1: “The very nature of WAR makes certainty impossible; all  actions in WAR are based on incomplete, inaccurate or even contradictory information.”

Combative Corollary: You will never have all the information you would like to have before needing to act except in the most obvious cases.

FM 1: “We can learn to fight effectively despite uncertainty by developing simple, flexible plans; planning for LIKELY contingencies and FOSTERING INITIATIVE.”

Combative Corollary: Avoid complex and intricate techniques. Take the initiative when warranted and pre-emptively attack. Strike unexpectedly. If a technique fails, immediately branch and EXPLODE into another. As quickly as you recognize them, EXPLOIT new targets.

FM 1: “Risk is equally common to ACTION or INACTION.”

Combative Corollary: You must risk being hurt in order to hurt others. As an attacker gestates, you’re at risk EQUALLY if you use violence and if you don’t.

FLUIDITY

FM 1: “Since war is a fluid phenomenon, it’s conduct requires flexibility of thought.”

Combatives Corollary: Rage with reason. Keep your wits about you in order to see and then seize the fleeting opportunities discussed above. Stay flexible in the attack. Rely on your rapid-targeting process and quickly branch from one technique to another, exploiting opportunities as quickly as they present themselves to overwhelm your attacker.

DISORDER

FM 1: “As the situation changes continuously, we are forced to improvise again and again until finally our actions have little, if any, resemblance to the original scheme.”

Combatives Corollary: There is a saying in the military: “No operations order survives the first shot.” Similarly, no Kata survives the first punch. Faced with disorder, ESTABLISH ORDER WITH OVERWHELMING FEROCITY. Once you have the momentum, stay on your toes and keep the attacker backing up on his heels. Ruthlessly and Relentlessly CLOSE WITH and finish the enemy.

THE HUMAN FACTOR

FM 1: “Since War is an act of violence based on irreconcilable disagreement, it will invariably inflame and be shaped by human emotions.”

Combatives Corollary: Channel your Rage, but rely on your Training.

Violence and Danger

FM 1: “Violence is an essential element of war and its immediate result is bloodshed, destruction and suffering. While the magnitude of violence may vary with the object and means of war, the violent essence of war will never change. Any study of war that neglects this basic truth is misleading or incomplete.”

Combatives Corollary: Your primary goal is to AVOID, your secondary goal is the ESCAPE UNHARMED. Unfortunately, depending on the severity of the situation, sometimes it will be necessary to seriously injure or perhaps kill an assailant in order to prevail. For that reason, you must never confuse Combatives with a “Gentle Art.”

Stay Alert, Armed and Dangerous!