Don’t Forget to Drill on Head Shot’s

 

Every time I see a hostage situation video and the end result is the bad guy getting a free lobotomy (as above) I am reminded of the Practicality of Drilling for such an event with both my pistol and rifle.

Why? Because when seconds count, the Cops are an hour away.

Don’t depend on somebody else to save your life or the life of your loved ones.

Train, Train and Train Some More!

A better and more specific term for the “Head Shot” would be the “Cranial T.”

Imagine drawing a uppercase T on the bad guy’s face starting at the eyes, not the forehead. Why?

The below picture is of a POS who took a 9mm MP-5 round to the forehead.

 

Two inches lower and it would have been light’s out for the Missing Link.

This article from SOFREP “Heads are Harder than you Think” explains things perfectly.

Bottom Line: Drill on taking these kind of shots regularly from various ranges with both handgun and rifle.

Because there is nobody coming to save you.

Prepare Accordingly.

*Similar Articles on the Practicality of Training for Head Shot’s can be Found HERE and HERE.

Bad Ass Files: Chesty Puller, USMC Gunslinger

CONSUMMATE MARINE CHESTY PULLER, .45 IN HAND!

 

Really well done mini-bio of one of my personal heroes.

Semper Fi Chesty!

Drawing Your Pistol While Seatbelted in a Vehicle: Click It or Ticket?

Drawing Your Pistol While Seatbelted in a Vehicle: Click It or Ticket?

 

This goes back to my previous article about Vehicle Security

We spend a LOT OF TIME in our Vehicles, often times more than we think.

Therefore, drilling on self-defense scenarios while driving are extremely important.

From my experience, situations like this (while inside a vehicle) are extremely fluid and complex.

Before we even start thinking about drawing our weapon we need to consider if EGRESS is possible?

I have always said that the 2 ton vehicle you are driving TRUMPS the 29 oz handgun you are carrying!

Consider and Know the Legalities in your State. In Texas, The Castle Doctrine states my vehicle is part of my domicile.

As far as the actual handgun drill, it needs to be drilled on 80/20.

80% dry fire to 20% live fire. Why? Repeition in Presenting the Firearm is the crux of the drill.

Regardless of how you choose to approach it (seatbelt off before or after) DRILL on it the same way, EVERY TIME until it is Smooth and free of snags.

Stay Dangerous!

The Armed Citizen Corner: The Surreptitious Draw, A Neglected Skill

The Surreptitious Draw: A Neglected Skill

 

I have long been a student of MAXIMIZING speed and efficency with weapons by MINIMIZING unncecessary body movement.

This is why I am a proponent of AIWB carry (Appendix Inside the Waistband) for both handgun and fixed blade knife.

“To draw the gun discreetly, focus on minimizing movement in the elbows and shoulders, as these movements clearly alert anyone who is watching that you are reaching for a weapon. Again, the AIWB carry position offers an advantage here as you can minimize the movement in your shoulders and elbows.”

 

Practice Makes Permanent

From the Archives, 2015

 

I first heard this from a Military Drill Instructor while on the firing line a long time ago and it stuck with me.

I apply it to just about every area of my life now, but especially FIREARMS TRAINING HABITS.

To me, it is the essence of WHY we should re-evaluate our combat training frequently. What could be worse than practicing the WRONG technique to the point we get GOOD at DOING IT WRONG!

On a frequent basis, we have to ask ourselves:

  • Are our techniques relevant to the threat level we face?

  • Are they Realistic?

  • Are they Efficient?

It also folds over to the small minutia of training, the little things we might overlook or do so often that we don’t even think about them.

Things like:

  • Reloading

  • Clearing Malfunctions

  • Shouldering the Rifle

  • Holstering

  • Clearing our cover garment (CCL Pistol/Revolver)

I will give you a great example on what I mean when I say “minutia”.

When I first started pistol training with a buddy of mine, we were out on the range and after we had just finished a course of fire, my Glock locked back to slide lock, empty. Since we were about to take a break, I simply hit the slide release lever and holstered my gun. My buddy looked at me comically and asked me “Would you do that in a gunfight?” I looked back at him and immediately a light bulb went off! Instantly I realized my error and what he was driving at.

When we are running drills we must do EVERYTHING as we would in a real fight, even the small details. If your gun runs dry, reload it. But reload it the same way, EVERY TIME. If you choose to use the slide release, do it, if you overhand charge, do that, but do it THE SAME WAY, EVERY TIME!

Now for some, who do not have the luxury of the great outdoors, away from civilization like me and who must practice at your Strict local NRA or IDPA Range, where over zealous Gun Safety nuts abound, this may be hard to do, but still, understanding the mental concept and working on it even in dry fire can get you far.

Gun Range Safety

In this quest to become a better warrior, the devil is always in the details.

The challenge as I see it is to challenge yourself every day.

Don’t wait for somebody else to challenge you! Take a minute and apply the above motto to every area of your life and you will see what I mean!

Stay Alert, Armed and Dangerous!