WW2 Movies Worth A Damn: Onoda – 10,000 Nights in the Jungle

‘Onoda – 10,000 Nights in the Jungle’: Cannes Review

 

The story of WW2 Japanese Army Second Lt. Hiroo Onoda is an amazing one to say the least.

For exactly 10,000 nights (29 years) Onoda survived alone in the jungles of the Philipine island of Lubang with only his wits, training and dedication to see him through.

For the military historian and martial citizen, the study of the “Secret War” in which the Japanese had trained Onoda in the Nakano School  is worthy of attention.

When Japan realized the War had been lost (around late 1943) The focus shifted on training soldiers (and some civilians) in the fundamental aspects of guerilla warfare and sabotage. The Japanese were planning to resist with a guerilla army both in the home islands and abroad.

Just a FYI: The Movie is rather long, coming in a just over two hours and forty-five minutes and is in French with English subtitles.

You can watch Onoda – 10,000 Nights in the Jungle HERE.

Japan’s Underwater Aircraft Carriers – part one

Amazing Read!

Pacific Paratrooper

Lieutenant Commander Stephen L. Johnson had a problem on his hands; a very large problem. His Balao-class submarine, the Segundo, had just picked up a large radar contact on the surface about 100 miles off Honshu, one of Japan’s home islands, heading south toward Tokyo.  World War II in the Pacific had just ended, and the ensuing cease fire was in its 14th day. The official peace documents would not be signed for several more days.

As Johnson closed on the other vessel, he realized it was a gigantic submarine, so large in fact that it first looked like a surface ship in the darkness. The Americans had nothing that size, so he realized that it had to be a Japanese submarine.

This was the first command for the lanky 29-year-old commander. He and his crew faced the largest and perhaps the most advanced submarine in the world…

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