Assaulting a Fixed Position

The Brécourt Manor Assault: Classic Small Unit Assault

 

The assault on the Brécourt Manor guns is a textbook example of frontal assault on a fixed position and is taught at West Point, as a case study. With 24 men, including reinforcements, Winters defeated approximately 60 Germans in a defensive position, killing about 20 and taking 12 prisoners, at the cost of only 6 American casualties: 4 dead and 2 wounded.

Originally, the commander of the 506th PIR put him up for the Medal of Honor, but US Army policy at the time limited the highest award to one per division: the MOH was awarded to Col. Robert G. Cole for his bayonet charge and taking the last 4 bridges on the road to Carentan.  Lt. Richard D. Winters was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross.

 

Examining Guerilla Warfare Tactics: Assaulting a Fixed Position

war

Small Unit Tactics: Assault on a Fixed Fortified Position

Another basic primer on SUT.

I will warn you though, this is a tactic that unless dire circumstances call for or your numbers are superior, I would avoid if possible.

Remember the strength of a small guerilla force is to harass and wear down by attrition, taking on fixed enemy strong points head on is more suited for large platoon or company sized conventional units with artillery and air support.

Stay Alert, Armed and Dangerous!

The World’s 20 Most Impressive Fortresses

fortress

Mighty military strongholds from ancient castles to modern innovations.

A fortress protects and gives military personnel a safe harbor from the enemy. But not all fortresses were created equal. And they certainly weren’t all created the same. We look over time and distance to find the 20 most impressive fortresses from around the world and throughout history.

GIBRALTAR

GIB

The legendary geography at the Rock of Gibraltar includes its sheer cliff face, difficult western slope, and location at the southern tip of Europe adjacent to the Strait of Gibraltar. Britain took advantage of this by enhancing medieval structures here, arming and fortifying the top of the rock in the 16th century. Centuries of improvements, including carving tunnels into the rock for armaments, troop movement, and storage, helped Britain to withstand siege attempts. Today the land is still technically a British overseas territory.

CHEYENNE MOUNTAIN COMPLEX

Cheyenne

Home of NORAD, which monitors pretty much everything in North American airspace, the Cheyenne Mountain Complex uses the mountains around Colorado Springs as fortification. Sitting inside a hollowed-out space in the mountains, the air defense system reached the height of its mystique during the Cold War when it opened in 1967. Its 25-ton blast doors are embedded within the 1,700 feet of granite. After a complete remodel, the buried site reopened for business in 2008.

CHITTOGAHR FORT

CHITTO

The largest fort in India covered 700 acres atop a 590-foot-tall hill, complete with towers and walls that have stood since the Maurya Empire built it near the Indian city of Udaipur in the 7th century. Fort Chittorgarh, also dubbed the Fort of Chittor, has a one-mile-long twisty road leading to it with seven gateways guarded by a watch tower and iron-spiked doors. While only 22 of the original 84 bodies of water within the fort still exist, 40 percent of the fort’s space was covered by water at one time—enough of a reservoir to hold about one billion gallons of water and, with rainfall, enough to maintain an army of 50,000 for four years without fear of thirst.