Our Roots, Our Present, Our Destiny

Our Roots, Our Present, Our Destiny

The recent announcement of the discovery of a 1,600 year old Anglo Saxon cemetery near Wendover in the Chilterns should both fascinate and thrill us. For it is yet another reminder of the way our racial forefathers lived and died in the hills, forests and vales that still surround us. The archaeologists involved in the dig, people like Dr. Rachel Wood of the Fusion Team, proclaiming ‘hugely significant’ and original finds like toothpicks, tweezers and eye-liner amongst the 138 graves containing 141 men, women and children.

For some great background on Anglo-Saxon society, check out this post over at Historical Vault 21 on Anglo-Saxon Kings.

 

 

Know, Embrace and Celebrate Your History: Our Ancestors, The Anglo-Saxons

Our Ancestors – The Anglo Saxons

 

Please share this with a young person in your circle of influence.

If we don’t Embrace and Celebrate our Roots, GloboHomo and Multiculturalism will dillute and destroy it.

Be Proud of Your Heritage and Culture!

 

 

Raise The Shield Wall!

Raise The Shield Wall!

 

I say it is time to raise the shield wall.

Especially when Western civilization is engaged in a life and death struggle for its very survival and our enemies are attempting to twist the very lexicon and identity forming descriptors we have used for centuries to define ourselves, in an attempt to supposedly ‘de-toxify’ what they perceive as ‘white supremacist’ terms.

A perfect example is the disingenuous way historians like  Dr. Mary Rambaran-Olm, a fellow at the University of Toronto, who specializes in race in early England and Sherif Abdelkarim at John Hopkins University, who apparently studies Early English language, assert that “First-millennium Britain offers one glimpse into the extent to which communities mixed and flourished…. suggesting extensive exchange and assimilation among Britain’s inhabitants and settlers.”

Their colleague Paul Edward Montgomery Ramírez, a Nicaraguan-American archaeologist, desperate to exaggerate the significance of a theological expression used by Alfred the Great, “You must not oppress foreigners and strangers, because you were once strangers in the land of Egypt,” making a timely intervention (especially coming from someone who shares the same heritage as the people currently rushing America’s southern border) to remind us that Britain was always multicultural.

And please remember the International Society of Anglo Saxonists (ISAS) have only recently been forced to drop the term Anglo Saxon and the academic department at Cambridge specializing in Anglo-Saxon, Norse and Celtic, as well as the longstanding Chairs of Anglo Saxon at Oxford (most famously held by J.R.R. Tolkien) have also been attacked for using such a divisive name.

Which brings me back to my core point.

Anyone making a detailed study of early English charters will see the predominant usage of the expressions englisc and angelcynn rather than Anglo Saxon (think also of the Roman Tacitus and the word Anglii)The very term Anglo Saxon was coined in fact on the continent to differentiate between German and English Saxons.

But accuracy is tangential to the reasons behind the arguments being put forward by the likes of  Rambaran-Olm, Abdelkarim and Gonzalez, who are in fact attempting to deconstruct the very meaning of the words Anglo Saxon, arguing fallaciously that “Archaeological evidence shows that people of sub-Saharan African descent lived in early England.”

I have even heard the descriptor Afro-Saxon being used. Politically correct historians abusing the fact that the descriptor Anglo Saxon was rarely used prior to the Norman Conquest of 1066 and became more common at the time of the British Empire’s major expansion in the nineteenth century in order to demonstrate the term was being applied to imply the superiority of “white people” by the Victorians.

Today’s liberal propagandists operating in the field of medieval studies increasingly trying to cast aside the use of the expression “Anglo-Saxon” because they continually insist it denotes Western superiority with one media article related to Rambaran-Olm’s work, ignoring the acclaimed work of academics like Stenton, Hill, Crossley-Holland, Hook, Carver, Campbell, Higham, Wood and Morris and instead saying:

‘Because in their (the left wing deconstructionists) view it has more connection to white hoods than boar-decorated helmets. The record shows that myths about the past can be exploited to create hateful policies. But as perceptive readers, we can arm ourselves against hate by wielding historical precision as a weapon’.

Which is why we need to defend the use of such terms as Anglo Saxon, Norse and Celtic, until we control these centres of research and teaching because it is for us, not our anti-white enemies, to provide nuance to these identities.

Especially given the reality that our people currently recognize such expressions as they relate to their ancestors. Indeed, walk into any bookshop and you will see, for now at least, histories referring to Anglo Saxons and Celts. That must be our starting point. Our cultural outreach must begin on such familiar ground.

Especially when it so rich and fascinating, contributing to who and what we are and linking us forever to the land that is ours by right of inheritance.

 

Aergeweorc

Aergeweorc

 

‘The period of history which we now call ‘Anglo-Saxon’ lasted from about the mid-fifth century to the end of the eleventh, after the Norman conquest. Most surviving Anglo Saxon manuscripts date from the latter part of that period and the majority of them are in Latin, but England was unique in Early Medieval Europe in having a thriving vernacular literature also – written in a language we all now call ‘Old English’ to distinguish it from the ‘Middle English’ stage of the evolving language, which culminated  in the works of Chaucer and Malory’.

“A language and culture brought to us in the cut and thrust of sword and axe, the cry of the woman in her labour pains and the serf sifting the grain and obeying his thegn in the battle line.”

 

 

Rooted in the Soil

Rooted in the Soil

“Which is why the royal personage who was entombed in Plas Gogerddan in Ceredigion in Wales is so important because just like the ship burial of his ‘significant other’ overlooking the River Deben near Woodbridge in Suffolk, he, like his ancestors, are rooted in the soil of these islands and are markers of distinct cultures, unique customs and precious histories that shape and define who and what we are and what we may still become.”

I just recently finished The Anglo-Saxons: A History of the Beginnings of England (400-1066) by Dr. Marc Morris and I HIGHLY recommend it to anybody who wants a deeper understanding of this INTEGRAL period of history.

I re-read some chapters two or three times, it’s that good!