Know Your History: The Navy Jack Flag

Navy Jack Flag: History of the First Navy Jack and The Ultimate Symbol of Freedom

 

From the good folks over at Ammo.com and Libertas Bella.

Stay Alert, Armed and Dangerous!

There are No Guardrails on the Left

THERE ARE NO GUARDRAILS ON THE LEFT

 

A short, practical essay on the current condition and future of America by author Matt Bracken.

Stay Alert, Armed and Dangerous!

 

 

The Culpeper Minutemen Flag: The History of the Banner Flown by a Militia of Patriots

As anyone who’s been to a Brushbeater Course here in NC knows, there’s a few flags that fly in the team room- centered among them is the Culpeper Minute Men Flag that I carried to Iraq and Afghanistan. 19 more words

via The Culpeper Minutemen Flag: The History of the Banner Flown by a Militia of Patriots — American Partisan

American Militias after the Civil War: From Black Codes to the Black Panthers and Beyond

Part 1 of this article can be read HERE.

 

Originally authored by our friends over at Ammo.com, this is the second half of their excellent historical analysis of militias in the US, running up to the Bundy Standoff and Malhuer Wildlife Refuge occupation. The critical takeaway is the coverage of militias on both sides of the ideological aisle and causes, ranging from post-Reconstruction era…

via American Militias after the Civil War: From Black Codes to the Black Panthers and Beyond — American Partisan

Native American History: The Bloodiest War in American History You Most Likely Never Heard About

On a per capita basis, King Phillip’s War was the Bloodiest War in American History. But being that it dealt with the Native American Indian, it has been suppressed over the centuries while other major “White Man” Wars and Conflicts have been pushed into the limelight.

We can never forget events like this. That is the moral imperative of history; that WE ALWAYS REMEMBER. -SF

king-philips-war1-H

King Philip’s War (1675-1676) marked the last major effort by the Native Americans of southern New England to drive out the English settlers. With tensions spilling over following the collapse of trade partnerships and aggressive expansion of colonist territories, Pokunoket chief Metacom — a.k.a. King Philip — led a bloody uprising of Wampanoag, Nipmuck, Pocumtuck and Narragansett tribes. The fighting lasted fourteen months and destroyed twelve frontier towns, ending shortly after Metacom was captured and beheaded. Some of his supporters escaped to Canada, while others who surrendered were sold into slavery.

King Philip’s War of 1675-1676 (also known as Metacom’s Rebellion) marked the last major effort by the Indians of southern New England to drive out the English settlers. Led by Metacom, the Pokunoket chief called ‘King Philip’ by the English, the bands known today as Wampanoag Indians joined with the Nipmucks, Pocumtucks, and Narragansetts in a bloody uprising. It lasted fourteen months and destroyed twelve frontier towns.

Read the Remainder at History