The Ruby Ridge Siege: The Forgotten History of the ATF Standoff That Started a Militia Movement

Survival Homestead

While Randy Weaver’s stand might have made the Feds think twice about coming in guns blazing the next time they can’t strongarm someone – with an eccentric lifestyle and unusual beliefs – into turning informant, this is likely cold comfort for Weaver who lost his 14-year-old son and wife.

This is why those in the freedom, patriot, Constitutional, survival and Second Amendment movements remember this day. It is a chilling reminder of the predatory and aggressive nature of federal law enforcement.

via ammo.com

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When Men were Men: Fitzroy Maclean

With all of this pansy ass liberalism trying to turn our young boys men into girls through feminist ideology and transgender non-sense, I thought I would create a section where Masculinity was CELEBRATED by telling the stories of awesome MEN through the ages who not only represented the Male Species with flare but also defended Democracy and helped save the Free World as we know it.

Fitzroy Maclean Fought the Nazis, Blew Up Forts and Met a King

 

Fitzroy Maclean, a Scottish aristocrat and adventurer, was born into a military family in Cairo in 1911, and was educated at Eton and then Cambridge – playgrounds of the British elite. He lived a long and remarkable life. “To some people, my life might seem one long adventure holiday, blowing up forts in the desert, clandestinely parachuting into guerrilla wars, penetrating forbidden cities deep behind closed frontiers,” he said a year before his death in 1996.

A diplomat and accomplished linguist prior to the outbreak of World War II, and a successful writer, politician and documentary filmmaker afterward, Maclean would’ve been a noteworthy figure without his almost unbelievable exploits in the war. His contribution to the war effort would lead him to rise from the rank of private in 1941 to brigadier in 1945, be appointed a Commander of the Order of the British Empire and receive the Order of Khutuzov from the Soviet Union, the Croix de Guerre from France and the Order of the Partisan Star from Yugoslavia.

Read the Remainder HERE

Profiles in Courage: Stephen Willeford

The Hero of Sutherland Springs 

 

We need to TEACH the next generation this unwavering TRUTH:

Unarmed People are SUBJECTS, Armed People are CITIZENS and only an ARMED CITIZEN can STOP an ARMED bad guy!

Stay Alert, Stay Armed and Stay Dangerous!

 

Fight Like A Girl and Other Lessons From a Stabbing

Fight Like A Girl And Other Lessons From A Stabbing

 

Really great read for not only Women but also Men; sometimes it pays to analyze and critique an attack like this in terms of what you were taught; what worked, what did not not and what you can do to IMPROVE your odds next time.

This statement really struck home:

“Self defense is a lose/lose situation. Even if you win, you’ve lost. You have been attacked or victimized in some way. All of your attempts at avoidance, evasion and deescalation have failed. You’ve already lost your battle to some level and now the goal is to lose less and survive.”

Stay Alert, Stay Armed and Stay Dangerous!

 

When Men Were Men: Fitzroy Maclean

With all of this pansy ass liberalism trying to turn our young boys men into girls through feminist ideology and transgender non-sense, I thought I would create a section where Masculinity was CELEBRATED by telling the stories of awesome MEN through the ages who not only represented the Male Species with flare but also defended Democracy and helped save the Free World as we know it.

Fitzroy Maclean Fought the Nazis, Blew Up Forts and Met a King

 

Fitzroy Maclean, a Scottish aristocrat and adventurer, was born into a military family in Cairo in 1911, and was educated at Eton and then Cambridge – playgrounds of the British elite. He lived a long and remarkable life. “To some people, my life might seem one long adventure holiday, blowing up forts in the desert, clandestinely parachuting into guerrilla wars, penetrating forbidden cities deep behind closed frontiers,” he said a year before his death in 1996.

A diplomat and accomplished linguist prior to the outbreak of World War II, and a successful writer, politician and documentary filmmaker afterward, Maclean would’ve been a noteworthy figure without his almost unbelievable exploits in the war. His contribution to the war effort would lead him to rise from the rank of private in 1941 to brigadier in 1945, be appointed a Commander of the Order of the British Empire and receive the Order of Khutuzov from the Soviet Union, the Croix de Guerre from France and the Order of the Partisan Star from Yugoslavia.

Read the Remainder HERE