The Food Expiration Dates You Should Actually Follow

The Food Expiration Dates You Should Actually Follow

 

Forgive me for linking a NY Times article, but since we are in the middle of one of the worst periods of inflation I can remember and grocery prices are just plain RIDICULOUS, I wanted to pass on this useful bit of information.

“Here’s the first thing you should know: Expiration dates are not expiration dates. Food product dating, as the U.S. Department of Agriculture calls it, is completely voluntary for all products (with the exception of baby food, more on that later). Not only that, but it has nothing to do with safety. It acts solely as the manufacturer’s best guess as to when its product will no longer be at peak quality, whatever that means. Food manufacturers also tend to be rather conservative with those dates, knowing that not all of us keep our pantries dark and open our refrigerators as minimally as necessary. (I, for one, would never leave the fridge door open for minutes at a time as I contemplate what to snack on.)”

 

 

The Mainstream Media Admits That We Are Facing “The Worst Food Crisis In Modern History”

H/T American Partisan

 

 

The Mainstream Media Admits That We Are Facing “The Worst Food Crisis In Modern History”

 

People on the other side of the planet are dropping dead from starvation right now, but most people don’t even realize that this is happening.  Unfortunately, most people just assume that everything is fine and dandy.  If you are one of those people that believe that everything is just wonderful, I would encourage you to pay close attention to the details that I am about to share with you.  Global hunger is rapidly spreading, and that is because global food supplies have been getting tighter and tighter.  If current trends continue, we could potentially be facing a nightmare scenario before this calendar year is over.

Pakistan is not one of the poorest nations in the world, but the lack of affordable food is starting to cause panic inside that country.  The following comes from Time Magazine

Last Saturday in Mirpur Khas, a city in Pakistan’s Sindh province, hundreds of people lined up for hours outside a park to buy subsidized wheat flour, offered for 65 rupees a kilogram instead of the current, inflated rate of about 140 to 160 rupees.

When a few trucks arrived, the crowd surged forward, leaving several injured. One man, Harsingh Kolhi, who was there to bring a five kg bag of flour home for his wife and children, was crushed and killed in the chaos.

Learn to be Self-Sufficient in Growing your own Food.

Nobody is Coming to Save You.

 

 

Audible Books for Free: One Second After & One Year After

When the Post-Apocalyptic genre really took off, One Second After was one of the first books that I read that had a profound impact on me as both a writer and prepper.

I went on to read the other two books in the series: One Year After and The Final Day.

The final installment of the series, Five Years After is set to be released on August 22, 2023.

Thanks to a conversation with VikingLife Blog, I was reminded there are a TON of books that can be listened to for FREE on YouTube via Audible.

Below are the first two books in this series: One Second After and One Year After.

Happy Listening!

 

One Second After

Part 1

 

One Second After

Part 2

 

One Year After

Another Reminder Why You Should Start Raising Chickens

Egg Prices Surge to Records as Bird Flu Decimates Poultry Flocks

I did an article back in March about raising Chickens and is always the case, things have gotten worse.

Not to mention Food Processing Plants and Granary’s keep blowing up or catching fire like this ONE in Michigan.

Prepare Accordingly.

Nine Meals From Anarchy Explained

Nine Meals From Anarchy Explained

 

 In 1906, Alfred Henry Lewis stated, “There are only nine meals between mankind and anarchy.” Since then, his observation has been echoed by people as disparate as Robert Heinlein and Leon Trotsky.

The key here is that, unlike all other commodities, food is the one essential that cannot be postponed. If there were a shortage of, say, shoes, we could make do for months or even years. A shortage of gasoline would be worse, but we could survive it, through mass transport or even walking, if necessary.

But food is different. If there were an interruption in the supply of food, fear would set in immediately. And, if the resumption of the food supply were uncertain, the fear would become pronounced. After only nine missed meals, it’s not unlikely that we’d panic and be prepared to commit a crime to acquire food. If we were to see our neighbour with a loaf of bread, and we owned a gun, we might well say, “I’m sorry, you’re a good neighbour and we’ve been friends for years, but my children haven’t eaten today – I have to have that bread – even if I have to shoot you.”

But surely, there’s no need to speculate on this concern. There’s nothing on the evening news to suggest that such a problem even might be on the horizon. So, let’s have a closer look at the actual food distribution industry, compare it to the present direction of the economy, and see whether there might be reason for concern.

The food industry typically operates on very small margins – often below 2%. Traditionally, wholesalers and retailers have relied on a two-week turnaround of supply and anywhere up to a 30-day payment plan. But an increasing tightening of the economic system for the last eight years has resulted in a turnaround time of just three days for both supply and payment for many in the industry. This a system that’s still fully operative, but with no further wiggle room, should it take a significant further hit.