Surviving Winter: A Mountain Man Pictorial Tribute

Surviving Winter

 

As a writer I very often rely on True West Magazine to supply me with both information and inspiration for my short stories and novels.

This pictorial tribute of Surviving Winter went a long way in helping me get started on a follow up to my “Red Tail” Jack Patterson Mountain Man series.

You can read the first installment of this series titled “Medicine Gun” HERE.

 

 

Know Your Texas History: Frank Hamer’s Sweetwater Gunfight

Frank Hamer’s Sweetwater Fight: Lessons Learned

 

As a writer and old west “enthusiast” I absolutely love reading about the old Texas warhorses like Frank Hamer.

Men who were cut from rawhide and raised in the traditions of the 19th century old west but forced to live in the modern “civilized” 20th century.

In short, men who were the last of the Old West Gunfighters.

“When we talk about personal defense, we may spend too much time talking about attacks from criminals who are not known to us.

It is also a good idea to realize that dangerous encounters can occur with people who are known to us. This reality should also be considered when we are formulating our own personal defense plans. That said, the overpowering urge should always be to find a way to avoid trouble whenever it is the least bit possible.”

 

For further reading on Hamer, I highly recommend these two books:

I’m Frank Hamer: The Life of a Texas Peace Officer

Manhunter: Frank Hamer, Texas Ranger (A Novel based on the Life and Times of Frank Hamer, Texas Ranger)

 

Bustamonte, I Hate You

Bustamonte, I Hate You

 

I can remember as a kid reading through my dad’s stack of Shooting Magazine and always looking forward to Skeeter Skelton’s articles.

Those articles were like western short stories…stories that briefly transported you to a simpler, honest and more rugged time.

Enjoy the ride, I know I did.

 

 

Hardin’s Deadly Tools

Hardin’s Deadly Tools

 

As a proud Texan I have always had a fascination with John Wesley Hardin.

This article is spot-on accurate when it comes to the details of Hardin’s last “gunfight” in the Acme saloon. This was surprsingly not an uncommon tactic by men wearing a tin star in the Old West when it came to facing known “gunhands” or gunfighters.

The so-called “lawmen” would seek to take the chance out of the confrontation and just flat our murder the man without a word being said thus ensuring that history would be written by the victors.

If you want to read some original short fiction by yours truly based on Hardin’s early life, check out Of Kith and Kin.