Know Your WW1 Weapon’s History: The Flammenwerfer

Flammenwefer — World War I German Flamethrowers

 

It appears the first flamethrower of modern design was patented in Germany by Richard Fiedler in 1901. During the same year, the German army funded his continued work on flamethrower designs. Fiedler, a private citizen, designed several flamethrowers models and presented a working product to the German army in 1905. Based on the feedback he received, two versions of the flammenwerfer were delivered to the army in 1908.

Around the same time, a multi-talented man by the name of Bernhard Reddemann began his own experiments in designing flamethrowers. Reddeman was an officer in a German Pioneer battalion until 1903. At that time, he transitioned to a reserve officer and stayed in a Pioneer unit. Pioneers were specialist troops frequently responsible for the demolition of fortifications, engineering strong points and using specialized weapons.

 

 

Know Your Rifles: The “Krag” aka Springfield Model 1892 Infantry Rifle

Story of the Krag: The Springfield Model 1892 Infantry Rifle

 

The formal appellation Springfield Model 1892-1899 describes the several subvariants of the Krag-Jorgensen bolt-action repeating rifle developed in the late 19th century. U.S. troops affectionately referred to the weapon as a “Krag.” The rifle was actually a collaborative effort of Norwegian gun designers Ole Herman Johannes Krag and Erik Jorgensen. The Krag was developed at a time when the entire planet was discovering bolt-action repeating infantry weapons. It nonetheless featured some radical new design elements.

Where most contemporary designs featured an internal box magazine loaded via stripper clips from above, the Krag magazine and its lateral loading system were integral components of the receiver. To load the weapon, you pivoted open a machined steel cover on the right and fed rounds one at a time from the side. Eventually, the army issued a claw-style clip that allowed the magazine to be loaded in a single step.

 

Why Russian Tanks Explode When Hit

History and War

Russian tanks used in modern conflicts have had very bad tendency of suffering catastrophic explosions. When penetrated into the magazine (“ammoracked” for gamers), Russian designs (particularly T-72 and its derivatives) tend to be violently relieved of their turret, which can fly off even some dozens of meters away.

The reason for this tendency towards turret throwing championship is their design decision – but not the one that is typically blamed for it.

Usual answer for why Russian tanks tend to explode is their use of the autoloader. Decision for using the autoloader is a logical one for the Soviet tank doctrine. It makes the tank much smaller, especially the turret – T-72 is almost a foot shorter than the M1 Abrams, allowing it to take cover more easily. Smaller profile also helps make the tank more mobile, as the same amount of armor can be had at the lower…

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Know Your WW2 Weapons: The German K43 Rifle, Deutschland’s DMR

GERMAN K43 RIFLE: DEUTSCHLAND’S DMR

 

K43 is German shorthand for Karabiner 43. The same weapon was also known as the Gewehr 43. A relatively simple gas-operated design, the K43 was the German answer to our M1 Garand. However, manufacturing pressures and a suboptimal design conspired to keep the K43 from reaching its full potential.

The K43 was an evolutionary development of the previous G41. Produced as the G41(M) from Mauser and the G41(W) from Walther, these two rifles suffered from an inexplicable design mandate that German engineers craft the weapons without drilling a gas port in the barrel. The end result was a gas trap design that was front-heavy, cumbersome, heavy and unreliable. About the time the Wehrmacht was convincing itself that the G41 was a dry hole, they encountered the Soviet SVT-38 and SVT-40 self-loaders in combat on the Eastern Front.

The subsequent G43/K43 featured a more conventional short-stroke piston-driven action with a flapper locking mechanism. Much of this rifle’s entrails seem eerily similar to those of the Soviet SVT-40. This system was easier to manufacture, more reliable and fairly robust. The weapon was semi-auto-only and fed from detachable 10-round box magazines that could also be charged from the top via standard stripper clips.

 

 

 

 

A Real World Reminder Why Citizens Should Never Give Up Their Semi-Auto Rifles

Myanmar Rebels Battle Government Junta Forces with Homemade Shotguns

The Video in the link above shows Myanmar Rebels armed with home made single shot shotguns fighting Govt. Military Forces armed with modern assault rifles.

The article does not say but I can almost promise you this fight did not end well for the rebels.

Going up against modern military rifles with single shot homemade shotguns from a fixed (entrenched) position is tactical suicide IMO but on the other hand I understand the rebels are desperate and do not have access to large quantities of military type rifles.

The rebels would have stood a better chance using molotov cocktails!

It’s both a Reminder as to why the Second Amendment Exist: So citizens can protect themselves from Government tyranny and an object lesson that we should NEVER willingly give up our guns, more especially our semi-automatic rifles!

Stay Armed and Prepare Accordingly.