The Legend of Lieutenant-Colonel Mike Hoare

I remember reading Congo Mercenary while deployed many moons back.

This guy was the stuff of legend.

Europe Renaissance

Mercenary ‘Mad Mike’ Hoare (1919-2022) was perhaps the best-known of the European mercenaries who fought in the Congo Crisis (1960-1965).  Born to Irish parents in Calcutta he was educated in England. A rarity for mercenaries who spend their lives on the frontlines, Hoare, at 101 years old seemingly benefited from the unstinting devotion of a very special and caring guardian angel. A veteran of numerous conflicts, Mike Hoare earned his spurs as an officer in the London Irish Rifles.

What does an army captain do when World War II becomes history? He becomes a chartered accountant of course. When led by Europeans prosperous and peaceful South Africa was a magnet for many disenchanted Britons. Mike Hoare was no exception. The amiable demobbed Brit set up a charted accountant’s business in South Africa.

As a South African citizen, Mike Hoare combined his sense of adventure and soldierly know-how to organise safaris…

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The Carver Technique

Know Your WW1 Weapon’s History: The Flammenwerfer

Flammenwefer — World War I German Flamethrowers

 

It appears the first flamethrower of modern design was patented in Germany by Richard Fiedler in 1901. During the same year, the German army funded his continued work on flamethrower designs. Fiedler, a private citizen, designed several flamethrowers models and presented a working product to the German army in 1905. Based on the feedback he received, two versions of the flammenwerfer were delivered to the army in 1908.

Around the same time, a multi-talented man by the name of Bernhard Reddemann began his own experiments in designing flamethrowers. Reddeman was an officer in a German Pioneer battalion until 1903. At that time, he transitioned to a reserve officer and stayed in a Pioneer unit. Pioneers were specialist troops frequently responsible for the demolition of fortifications, engineering strong points and using specialized weapons.

 

 

Low-Tech to No-Tech is The Way

Analog all the way!
Paper don’t need batteries.

Tactical Wisdom

Being a public figure in the preparedness world, I get swamped with people asking me for my recommendations on the latest and coolest cool-guy Ultra-Tacticool gear. Which night vision should I buy, what’s the best range finder, and what rifle accessories do I need top the list.

While I give the best answers I can (and I’ll try to here), I always wonder if they’ve even read my first book, the Baseline Training Manual, where I spell out my philosophy on this. My philosophy is to go with no or low-tech options, every time. Technology is a point of failure. You’ll need batteries or repairs, so the answer is to learn to do without. You don’t need the $375 ultra-light backpacking tent; you need a tarp and some para-cord.

This is what the Lord says: “Stand at the crossroads and look; ask for the ancient paths, ask where the good way…

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The Last Valley

H/T WRSA