Pacific Profiles Book Review

WW2 Military History Reference Books.

Inch High Guy

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Pacific Profiles Volume One: Japanese Army Fighters New Guinea & the Solomons 1942-1944

By Michael Claringbould

Softcover, 104 pages, index, photographs, and 85 color profiles

Published by Avonmore Books, December 2020

Language: English

ISBN-10: 0648665917

ISBN-13: 978-0648665915

Dimensions: 6.9 x 0.2 x 9.8 inches

At the close of the Pacific War the Imperial Japanese Army and Navy were directed to destroy their records and photographs, including logbooks and snapshots kept by the individual service members. This order, coupled with the language barrier, has long frustrated historians and modelers researching the Japanese military. The result is few publications in English on the subject, and even many Japanese language sources lack the depth and detail seen in their foreign counterparts.

The author has stepped squarely into this void. An Australian who spent several years in New Guinea, Michael Claringbould had the opportunity to examine many of the aircraft wrecks there and recorded…

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12 Military Novels That Need to be Adapted into Movies or TV Series

12 Military Movies and TV Shows That We Desperately Need Right Now

 

Off the top of my head I would also add: Outlaw Platoon, Roughneck Nine-One, The Lion’s Gate  and Not a Good Day to Die.

Stay Alert, Armed and Dangerous!

 

Ordnance P-38 Lightning

I remember reading Fork Tailed Devil as a kid and after that building every P-38 model I could find and reading every book.

Pacific Paratrooper

P-38 in the Pacific

Perhaps Colonel Ben Kelsey, a P-38 test pilot, summed up the war bird’s legacy best of all. “(That) comfortable old cluck,” he said, “would fly like hell, fight like a wasp upstairs, and land like a butterfly.”

The P-38 was the most successful USAAF fighter in the Pacific War. It served with four separate air forces, spread out from Australia to Alaska. The most successful American Ace of the Second World War, Major Richard Bong, scored all 40 of his victories flying the P-38 Lightning over the Pacific.

P-38

The 11th Air Force was allocated the task of defending the Aleutian Islands, in the far north of the Pacific. There the extra reliability provided by the twin engines of the P-38 was essential, with missions being flown over long distances and in poor weather. The first P-38 victories of the war fell to pilots of the…

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Some Civil War History You Were Not Taught in School

 

Lincoln’s Kind of “Soldier”

 

The American History You’re Not Supposed to Know

 

I have been a huge fan of Mr. DiLorenzo’s work ever since I read The Real Lincoln over a decade ago.

I urge all of you to dive into all of Mr. DiLorenzo’s books and articles and get a fresh, politically incorrect perspective on one of the most misunderstood and maligned wars in American History.

Remember, as Orwell told us, the only way the globalist marxist elite can control the future is to try and manipulate the past to conform it to it’s current narrative and no other period in American History is fundamental to this than the American Civil War.

Stay Alert, Armed and Dangerous!

 

Luftwaffe in Africa Book Review

Inch High Guy

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Luftwaffe in Africa, 1941-1943

By Jean-Louis Roba

Paperback, 128 pages, heavily illustrated, index

Published by Casemate, November 2019

Language: English

ISBN-10: 1612007457

ISBN-13: 978-1-61200-7458

Product Dimensions: 7.0 x 0.5 x 10.0 inches

Germany was drawn into the war in North Africa by Mussolini’s ambitions.  Italy had little to gain by conquering the region; Germany even less so.  For the German Army and particularly the Luftwaffe North Africa did little more than provide an ever-increasing drain on assets which could have been better used in the Soviet Union.  Once the influx of American men and material began to be felt the Axis cause was beyond redemption.

This volume provides a good overview of the progression of the campaign in North Africa from the Luftwaffe perspective.  There were quite a large number of units committed over time but Germany was never able to achieve the concentration of force necessary to achieve her…

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