THE IRISH HOLOCAUST NO ONE MENTIONS

Know Your History Folks.. The Truth is Out There!

 

It is estimated that deliberate starvation, slavery and the expulsion of the Irish (and Scottish) peoples in fairly recent history led to a 50 percent loss of population. If this is so, these two nations suffered a population loss far worse than did the Slavs under Jewish Bolshevism or by Germany that suffered a 13 million loss of population following World War II on account of Allied policy.

via THE IRISH HOLOCAUST NO ONE MENTIONS — THE ETHNIC-EUROPEAN

Holocaust Rememberance Week

In America, the Holocaust Is Losing Its Shock Factor

Although January 27th is the Official Holocaust Rememberance Day, The President has made April 12th thru April 19th a Special National week of Remembrance for all the victims of the Holocaust.

To ALL parents with kids still at home, I would urge you to have a frank and honest discussion about the history of the holocaust and the importance of remembering what happened so it is not repeated.

In my household, we like to watch movies and documentaries. Schindler’s List of course is the go-too classic. We watch it at least a couple times a year. There are several other worthwhile movies; the most recent one being Denial, a very famous true story about holocaust denial.

On the documentary front, there are so many good ones, but the top one I would recommend would be the USC Shoah FoundationThis is the foundation that Steven Spielberg helped fund after he made Schindler’s List. It has thousands of hours of testimonial recordings from actual Holocaust survivors about their terrible experiences inside the death camps.

 

Stay Alert, Stay Armed and Stay Dangerous!

 

World War Two History: Piss On Your Enemies! (Literally)

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When a Jewish Holocaust survivor ‘pissed’ on Hitler’s henchman

(click on above link to be re-directed)

I absolutely love finding stories like this about survivors of the Holocaust getting some type of revenge on Nazi’s. So many times the punishment the nazi’s received was not “personal” enough to fit the crime IMO, but here, it is all about personal!

 

 

Stay Alert, Stay Armed and Stay Dangerous!

Holocaust History: A Journey Into Pol Pot’s Madness

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If not for Cambodia’s dark past, there would be no reason for anyone to visit the quiet fields south of Phnom Penh.

A short tuk-tuk ride through the city’s dusty streets takes curious travelers to the kind of place that can only be found in a country that has experienced the worst kind of cruelty.

Marked today by a memorial stupa, or relic mound, filled with 5,000 human skulls, the Choeung Ek Genocidal Center — a.k.a., the Killing Fields — in Phnom Penh’s Danokar district is the most well-known of Cambodia’s many outdoor execution and mass-grave sites from the brief Democratic Kampuchea period between 1975 to 1979, when the communist Khmer Rouge ruled the country.

After defeating Cambodia’s Khmer Republic government in 1975, overrunning the capital Phnom Penh on April 17, 1975–13 days before the fall of Saigon — the Khmer Rouge launched a campaign of violence that rivaled the Holocaust and Rwandan genocide.

The Khmer Rouge forced Phnom Penh’s residents to work on massive communal agriculture colonies across Cambodia. They were, in essence, slaves.

Led by Saloth Sar, more commonly known as Pol Pot — a Cambodian who studied in Paris and was distantly connected to the Cambodian royal family — the Khmer Rouge killed anyone with even indirect links to the West, as well as doctors, teachers and other professionals.

The slightest indiscretion or reason for suspicion met with extreme violence or even execution. Roughly 17,000 people died on the fields of Choeung Ek— mostly Cambodians but also a handful of Westerners. The Khmer Rouge slaughtered its victims with bayonets, clubs and knives.

In all, between 1.5 million and three million people died.

 Read the Remainder at War is Boring

Holocaust History: Syndrome K – The Fake Disease That Saved Jews From the Nazi’s

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In the fall of 1943, German soldiers in Italy began rounding up Italian Jews and deporting them—10,000 people were sent to concentration camps during the nearly two-year Nazi occupation. Most never returned. But in Rome, a group of doctors saved at least 20 Jews from a similar fate, by diagnosing them with Syndrome K, a deadly, disfiguring, and contagiosissima disease.

The 450-year-old Fatebenefratelli Hospital is nestled on a tiny island in the middle of Rome’s Tiber River, just across from the Jewish Ghetto. When Nazis raided the area on Oct. 16, 1943, a handful of Jews fled to the Catholic hospital, where they were quickly given case files reading “Syndrome K.”

The disease did not exist in any medical textbook or physician’s chart. In fact, it didn’t exist at all. It was a codename invented by doctor and anti-fascist activist Adriano Ossicini, to help distinguish between real patients and healthy hideaways. (Political dissidents and a revolutionary underground radio station were also sheltered there from Italy’s Fascist regime.)

The fake illness was vividly imagined: Rooms holding “Syndrome K” sufferers were designated as dangerously infectious—dissuading Nazi inspectors from entering—and Jewish children were instructed to cough, in imitation of tuberculosis, when soldiers passed through the hospital.
“The Nazis thought it was cancer or tuberculosis, and they fled like rabbits,” Vittorio Sacerdoti, a Jewish doctor working at the hospital under a false name, told the BBC in 2004. Another doctor orchestrating the life-saving lie was surgeon Giovani Borromeo, later recognized by Israeli Holocaust remembrance organization Yad Vashem as “righteous among nations.”

On June 21, Fatebenefratelli was honored as a “House of Life,” by the Raoul Wallenberg Foundation, a US organization dedicated to honoring heroic acts during the Holocaust. For the occasion, 96-year-old Ossicini granted an interview to Italian newspaper La Stampa (video in Italian) about the invention of the disease:

“Syndrome K was put on patient papers to indicate that the sick person wasn’t sick at all, but Jewish. We created those papers for Jewish people as if they were ordinary patients, and in the moment when we had to say what disease they suffered? It was Syndrome K, meaning ‘I am admitting a Jew,’ as if he or she were ill, but they were all healthy.

The idea to call it Syndrome K, like Kesserling or Kappler, was mine.”

Albert Kesserling was the German commander overseeing Rome’s occupation. SS chief Herbert Kappler had been installed as city police chief, and would later mastermind the Ardeatine massacre, a mass killing of Italian Jews and political prisoners in 1944.

“The lesson of my experience was that we have to act not for the sake of self-interest, but for principles,” said Ossicini. “Anything else is a shame.”

Accounts of how many Italian Jews were saved by Fatebenefratelli Hospital vary from dozens to hundreds, but survivor testimonies gathered by Yad Vashem confirm that at least a few more lives were saved after Oct. 16. Several families with small children sheltered there through the winter, until German forces swept through the hospital again in May 1944. One attendant at the Wallenberg ceremony, 83-year-old Luciana Tedesco, was safely hidden in the hospital as a small child during the last raid.

Italy’s Jewish community is one of oldest in Europe, and Syndrome K is one of many WWII-era anecdotes of ordinary Italians taking extraordinary action to save the lives of fellow citizens, made even more striking against the historical backdrop of Italy’s own anti-Semitic laws. Nearly 9,000 Roman Jews, of a community of 10,000, ultimately managed to evade arrest, a feat sadly dwarfed by the Third Reich’s genocidal mania in the last years of the war.
Read the Original Article at Quartz

In Memoriam: Elie Wiesel

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Holocaust survivor, Nobel laureate Elie Wiesel dies at 87

Activist and writer Elie Wiesel, the World War Two death camp survivor who won a Nobel Peace Prize for becoming the life-long voice of millions of Holocaust victims, died on Saturday. He was 87.

Wiesel was a philosopher, speaker, playwright and professor who also campaigned for the tyrannized and forgotten around the world. He died at his home in New York City, the New York Times reported.

The Romanian-born Wiesel lived by the credo expressed in “Night,” his landmark story of the Holocaust – “to forget the dead would be akin to killing them a second time.”

In awarding the Peace Prize in 1986, the Nobel Committee praised him as a “messenger to mankind” and “one of the most important spiritual leaders and guides in an age when violence, repression and racism continue to characterize the world.”

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu hailed Wiesel as a ray of light, and said his extraordinary personality and unforgettable books demonstrated the triumph of the human spirit over the most unimaginable evil.

“Out of the darkness of the Holocaust, Elie became a powerful force for light, truth and dignity,” he said.

Wiesel did not waver in his campaign never to let the world forget the Holocaust horror. While at the White House in 1985 to receive the Congressional Gold Medal, he even rebuked U.S. President Ronald Reagan for planning to lay a wreath at a German cemetery where some of Hitler’s notorious Waffen SS troops were buried.

“Don’t go to Bitburg,” Wiesel said. “That place is not your place. Your place is with the victims of the SS.”

Wiesel became close to U.S. President Barack Obama but the friendship did not deter him from criticizing U.S. policy on Israel. He spoke out in favor of Jewish settlements in East Jerusalem and pushed the United States and other world powers to take a harder stance against Iran over its nuclear program.

Wiesel attended the joint session of the U.S. Congress in 2015 when Netanyahu spoke on the dangers of Iran’s program.

U.S. Senator Ben Cardin, ranking member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, described Wiesel as a voice for a generation of the Jewish people who saw and suffered horrors no people should endure.

“His light in this world will be greatly missed,” Cardin said in a statement.

Wiesel and his foundation both were victims of the wide-ranging Ponzi scheme run by New York financier Bernie Madoff, with Wiesel and his wife losing their life’s savings and the foundation losing $15.2 million. “‘Psychopath’ – it’s too nice a word for him,” he said of Madoff in 2009.

Wiesel was a hollow-eyed 16-year-old when he emerged from the newly liberated Buchenwald concentration camp in 1945. He had been orphaned by the Nazis and their identification number, A-7713, was tattooed on his arm as a physical manifestation of his broken faith and the nightmares that would haunt him throughout his life.

Wiesel and his family had first been taken by the Nazis from the village of Sighetu Marmatiei in the Transylvania region of Romania to Auschwitz, where his mother and one of his sisters died. Wiesel and his father, Shlomo, ended up in Buchenwald, where Shlomo died. In “Night” Wiesel wrote of his shame at lying silently in his bunk while his father was beaten nearby.

After the war Wiesel made his way to France, studied at the Sorbonne and by 19 had become a journalist. He pondered suicide and never wrote of or discussed his Holocaust experience until 10 years after the war as a part of a vow to himself. He was 27 years old in 1955 when “Night” was published in Yiddish, and Wiesel would later rewrite it for a world audience.

“Never shall I forget that night, the first night in camp, which has turned my life into long night, seven times cursed and seven times sealed …,” Wiesel wrote. “Never shall I forget those flames that consumed my faith forever. Never shall I forget that nocturnal silence which deprived me, for all eternity, of the desire to live.”

Asked by an interviewer in 2000 why he did not go insane, Wiesel said, “To this day that is a mystery to me.”

By 2008, “Night” had sold an estimated 10 million copies, according to the New York Times, including 3 million after talk-show hostess Oprah Winfrey made it a spotlight selection for her book club in 2006.

 In 1985 Wiesel helped break ground in Washington for the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum and the following year was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. In typical fashion, he dedicated the prize to all those who survived the Nazi horror, calling them “an example to humankind how not to succumb to despair.”

Wiesel, who became a U.S. citizen in 1963, was slight in stature but a compelling figure when he spoke. With a chiseled profile, burning eyes and a shock of gray hair, he could silence a crowd by merely standing up.

He was often described as somber. An old friend, Chicago professor Irving Abrahamson, once said of him: “I’ve never seen Elie give a belly laugh. He’ll chuckle, he’ll smile, there’ll be a twinkle in his eye. But never a laugh from within.”

A few years after winning the peace prize, he set up the Elie Wiesel Foundation for Humanity, which, in addition to Israeli and Jewish causes, campaigned for Miskito Indians in Nicaragua, Cambodian refugees, victims of South African apartheid and of famine and genocide in Africa.

Wiesel wrote more than 50 books – novels, non-fiction, memoirs and many with a Holocaust theme – and held a long-running professorship at Boston University. In one of his later books, “Open Heart,” he used his 2011 quintuple-bypass surgery as impetus for reflection on his life.

“I have already been the beneficiary of so many miracles, which I know I owe to my ancestors,” he wrote. “All I have achieved has been and continues to be dedicated to their murdered dreams – and hopes.”

He collected scores of awards and honors, including an honorary knighthood in Britain. Obama presented him the National Humanities Medal in 2009.

Wiesel was attacked in a San Francisco hotel in 2007 by a 22-year-old Holocaust denier, but not injured.

Wiesel and wife Marion married in 1969 and their son, Elisha, was born in 1972.

Read the Original Article at Yahoo News

Holocaust History: 70 Year Old Escape Tunnel Dug By Jews With Hands and Spoons Found in Lithuania

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Researchers uncover hidden passage where 80 Jewish prisoners painstakingly dug their way out of the Ponar forest death pits by hand

An international research team has located a forgotten tunnel in Lithuania dug by Jewish prisoners trying to escape their Nazi captors during World War II, the Israel Antiquities Authority said Wednesday.

A team of archaeologists and mapmakers from Israel, the US, Canada and Lithuania used mineral and oil exploration scanning technology to pinpoint the tunnel, the authority said in a statement Wednesday.

The 35-meter (115-foot) tunnel is located in the Ponar forest, known today as Paneriai, where the Nazis killed 100,000 people – mostly Jews – during the Holocaust.

Israeli researcher Dr. Jon Seligman, whose family originated from Lithuania, said the discovery of the Ponar tunnel “reduced him to tears.”

“This is a heartwarming testimony to the victory of hope over despair,” he said according to the IAA statement. “The discovery of the tunnel allows us to not only expose the horrors of the Holocaust, but also the hope for life.”

Seligman led the team of researchers together with US Jewish History Professor Richard Freund of the University of Hartford in Connecticut.

Thanks to advances in archaeological technology — namely ground penetrating radar and electrical resistivity tomography — Freund said his team was able to examine the site without disturbing the remains of the some 100,000 people buried there.