Know your WW2 History: The revolutionary fuse that won World War II

The revolutionary fuse that helped win World War II

 

Some very interesting reading on a device that helped shorten the war considerably.

Stay Alert, Armed and Dangerous!

 

Alfred the Great’s Navy

Interesting piece of Anglo-Saxon History.

For all who are interested Bernard Cornwell’s Saxon Tales recount this amazing period of history (from a fictional standpoint but still very historically accurate) including this amazing battle.

The Last Kingdom TV series are closely based on the novels, so I recommend those also!

 

Weapons and Warfare

The treaty with Guthrum gave Alfred the breathing space he needed to fortify and revitalize Wessex. As the last outpost of independent England, it was essential for Wessex to have an efficient military.

Alfred the Great reorganized Wessex’s army, keeping half of the men on duty at any given time. And although Alfred is famous as the father of the English Navy, kings before Alfred had used war ships. Nonetheless, recognizing that swift ships were just one more advantage the Vikings held over the English, Alfred brought over from Frisia (modern-day Holland) skilled shipwrights to build his new navy.

Guthrum gave Alfred seven years to rebuild his kingdom, but then the double-dealing Viking broke the treaty and invaded Wessex in 885 and laid siege to Rochester. But Alfred’s new military defensive measures worked. Mobilizing his standing army, his burh garrisons, and his navy, he broke the Danish siege easily, then…

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The Ruby Ridge Siege: The Forgotten History of the ATF Standoff That Started a Militia Movement

Survival Homestead

While Randy Weaver’s stand might have made the Feds think twice about coming in guns blazing the next time they can’t strongarm someone – with an eccentric lifestyle and unusual beliefs – into turning informant, this is likely cold comfort for Weaver who lost his 14-year-old son and wife.

This is why those in the freedom, patriot, Constitutional, survival and Second Amendment movements remember this day. It is a chilling reminder of the predatory and aggressive nature of federal law enforcement.

via ammo.com

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The Revolutionary Language and Behavior of the Whiskey Rebels

Survival Homestead

Regardless of the elites’ belief in a class system where some were inherently more qualified to make political decisions, much of the “poor and middling class” still believed in their own capacity to decide their fate.[40] Many American colonists believed enough in their own political competence to fight the greatest military in the world for independence. Civil unrest throughout the 1780s and 1790s showed that spirit still lived on in the rural populations who protested against what they saw as unjust rule.

Journal of the American Revolution

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Ordnance P-38 Lightning

I remember reading Fork Tailed Devil as a kid and after that building every P-38 model I could find and reading every book.

Pacific Paratrooper

P-38 in the Pacific

Perhaps Colonel Ben Kelsey, a P-38 test pilot, summed up the war bird’s legacy best of all. “(That) comfortable old cluck,” he said, “would fly like hell, fight like a wasp upstairs, and land like a butterfly.”

The P-38 was the most successful USAAF fighter in the Pacific War. It served with four separate air forces, spread out from Australia to Alaska. The most successful American Ace of the Second World War, Major Richard Bong, scored all 40 of his victories flying the P-38 Lightning over the Pacific.

P-38

The 11th Air Force was allocated the task of defending the Aleutian Islands, in the far north of the Pacific. There the extra reliability provided by the twin engines of the P-38 was essential, with missions being flown over long distances and in poor weather. The first P-38 victories of the war fell to pilots of the…

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