Japanese Naval Aces and Fighter Units in World War II Book Review

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Japanese Naval Aces and Fighter Units in World War II

By Ikuhiko Hata and Yasuho Izawa, Translated by Don Cyril Gorham

Hardcover in dustjacket, 432 pages, appendices, and index. Illustrated with photographs throughout.

Published by Naval Institute Press November 1989

Language: English

ISBN-10: 0-87021-3156

ISBN-13: 978-0-87021-3151

Dimensions: 7.3 x 1.4 x 10.3 inches

Even today, it is comparatively difficult to find detailed information about Japanese military units in the Second World War. The Pacific Theater was vast, the ocean or jungles swallowed up entire units with their ultimate fates being inferred only after the war by comparison with Allied records. Most original wartime records and photographs were ordered destroyed by the Japanese government, whether officially held or in private collections. This periodically results in the re-discovery of some lost detail of interest of historians and modelers, such as the recent revelation of the shape of the stern of the battleship…

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Know your WW2 History: The revolutionary fuse that won World War II

The revolutionary fuse that helped win World War II

 

Some very interesting reading on a device that helped shorten the war considerably.

Stay Alert, Armed and Dangerous!

 

A LOT OF LUCK AND A JAGDPANTHER

Never Say Die.
As Long as you Got Ammo and Breath, Keep Fighting!

Weapons and Warfare

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Oberfeldwebel Hermann Bix, tank commander in Panzer-Regiment 35

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The Rearguard by David Pentland.
reussisch Stargard, East Prussia, February 1945. Following the departure of the platoon’s two other vehicles, after expending all their ammunition, the single Jagdpanther of Oberfeldwebel Hermann Bix remained to cover the withdrawal of all supporting infantry in the area. Hidden behind a muck heap, with only twenty armour piercing and five high explosive shells remaining he made the attacking Soviet Shermans pay a heavy price, destroying sixteen of their number before he too fell back out of ammunition.

We were really upset when we did not receive the accustomed and promised Panzer V’s and were issued instead the Jagdpanther, which could not be sent to an assault-gun battalion as a result of the general chaos.

Out of necessity, we then took a closer look at the new gear. The crates did not have a turret. You had…

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Know Your Weapons: WW1 Night Sights – Gewehr 98 and SMLE

Germany, Britain, and France all introduced luminous night sights for their service rifles in 1916. Today we are looking at a Gewehr 98 and an SMLE that have detachable WW1 night sights fitted (and the SMLE also has a metal muzzle cover device).

WW1 Night Sights: Gewehr 98 and SMLE — Forgotten Weapons