Requiem for a Culture Part 4: The Amelia Christmas Parade

H/T WRSA

Requiem for a Culture Part 4: The Amelia Christmas Parade

 

This is the fourth essay in an occasional series.

Previously: Part 1Part 2Part 3.

 

“The past is never dead. It’s not even past.”

-William Faulkner, Requiem for a Nun, Act I, Scene III (page 80 in the Vintage paperback edition)

 

Requiem for a Culture Part 3: The Battle of Staunton River Bridge

Requiem for a Culture, Part 3: The Battle of Staunton River Bridge

 

On June 23rd General Lee sent word to Captain Benjamin Farinholt, who commanded a battalion of reserves charged with defending the bridge, warning him that the Federals were about to come down hard on him, and ordering him to prevent the bridge from being destroyed. If the Union troops were able to get to the bridge even briefly, they would pour oil on its wooden structure and torch it.

Captain Farinholt’s situation was dire. He commanded a force of fewer than 300 soldiers, and had only six artillery pieces with which to confront the sixteen being fielded by the Northern cavalry.

That night he sent word out to the surrounding communities, asking for volunteers to help defend the bridge. Military-age men had already been siphoned off by conscription, so the captain was drawing on teenage boys and men over 45 to form hastily-assembled militias. In popular accounts written after the war they were referred to as the “Brigade of Old Men and Young Boys”.

The new arrivals were also augmented by 150 Confederate regulars from detachments stationed around the region. With the regulars added to the old men and boys, Captain Farinholt was able to deploy a force of 938 men — less than 20% of the size of the cavalry units bearing down on him.”

 

Know Your Southern History: Major General Patrick Cleburne, CSA

Cleburne Part I: The Making of an Irish-Southern Nationalist

The following is a four-part series on the life of Major General Patrick Cleburne, C.S.A. It derives heavily from two sources, “Cleburne and His Command,” by Captain Irving A. Buck, C.S.A., (1908), and “Stonewall of the West: Patrick Cleburne & the Civil War,” by Professor Craig L. Symonds, Lieutenant U.S.N.R., (1997).  For the sake of brevity in a blog article, citations will refer to last name and page reference.

 

 

The Noble Carolinians, A Walk to Remember

The Noble Carolinians, A Walk to Remember

 

“The Empire is a slow and methodical killer, especially for our people. It has slowly bled us since 1861. If it does not destroy our bodies, on foreign battlefields for vain glory and gold, as in the case of my father, it will most certainly destroy our reputations, as it has the great men of Dixie, such as John C. Calhoun. However, we are getting wiser, no longer enjoining our sons in large numbers as in times past, no longer the janissary class of this dying empire. We are remembering our heroes, as these two great South Carolinians, and pursuing a path that will lead us into the future, unashamed and vigilant to see our ancestors’ vision of a free and independent Dixie accomplished, in a glorious and victorious age!”

Take Heed.

 

 

A Refutation of Jesse James: Last Rebel of the Civil War by T.J. Stiles

Jesse James: Last Rebel of the Civil War

 

Being a writer, historian and defender of Southern History, more specifically “Reconstruction Era” Southern/Confederate History that is rife with political bias and inaccuracies by writers looking to demonize not only the Confederate cause but also the good, God fearing Southern people (many of them my relatives) caught under the yoke of Federal tyranny during so-called “Reconstruction”, this brief refutation of T.J. Stiles book on Jesse James was a breath of fresh air to be sure.

 

“Stiles offers the most recent interpretation of Jesse as a political terrorist. Stiles continually laments the end of Reconstruction and is on the side of the oppressed blacks.

These days, however, after George Floyd, Black Lives Matter, and a never-ending cycle of black crime and welfare abuse that is harder to defend than it was 30 years ago, Jesse’s stance might have new admirers.

In his ‘History of the American People’, Paul Johnson notes that the Civil War ended the slavery problem and began the Negro problem, which is still with us.

An authoritarian federal government such as the one that arose under Abraham Lincoln and persisted until the end of Reconstruction dismantled it has arisen again, and in the age of Biden it is readily acknowledged to be an immoral, tyrannical threat to the American people. Perhaps not by all of them, but certainly the smell of disenfranchisement is in the air as much as it was in Jesse’s world of 1861 Missouri.

Yet now, a great percentage of the American populace is seen as “Deplorables,” and it is being made clear by the Yankees’ descendants that this is a class which mustn’t be allowed to exist. In the 2020 election, Chris Wallace grilled both candidates about white supremacy. Now, merely being white is crime enough, according to the ruling class. I wonder if more and more people are thinking that if I’m gonna do the time, I might as well do the crime. Jesse appears less as Robin Hood today than as someone fighting to stay alive against a repressive government. As the bumper sticker says, when freedom is outlawed, only outlaws will be free.

Perhaps the final word on Jesse James and his bushwhacker past might be from Ang Lee’s magnificent film Ride With the Devil, which was adapted from Daniel Woodrell’s novel Woe to Live On. Alex Linder’s review of the film questioned whether liberty is consistent with civilized order. Linder felt that the film showed that feral men are the only free men.”