Setting Up A Kalashnikov For Combat

Setting Up A Kalashnikov For Combat: The Palmetto State Armory GF-3E

 

Outstanding article by fellow AK Afficionado and one of the best trainers currently working in the business, NC Scout (aka Brusbeater.)

As I have said many times, If you are in the market for an AK, Palmetto State Armory is the place to go.

FYI: Scout’s Article on the PSA AK-104 is required reading for the student of the Kalash.

 

SKS Collecting And Identification: A Buyer’s Guide

SKS Collecting And Identification: A Buyer’s Guide

 

I had a C&R License (FFL 03) for around twenty years off and on back in the “golden era” when you could find plenty of German and Yugo Mausers, Lee- Enfields, Mosin-Nagants, Swiss K-31’s and Norinco and Russian SKS’s all for very reasonable prices.

It was a great way to learn about firearms, improve your gusnmithing skill-set (I taught myself how to repair Mausers this way) and amass a nice “collection” of very usable military weaponry including pistols and revolvers.

One of the many perks of having a C&R License is you get the weapon delivered directly to your home without the need of a Gun Dealer as a middleman. I cannot tell you the excitement of seeing the Big Brown Truck of Joy come rumbling up the road!

Glock Pistols- What Breaks and How to Fix It

Glock Pistols- What Breaks and How to Fix It

 

Fairly comprehensive primer on how to keep your Austrian Ass Kicker Kicking.

 

 

Know Your Weapons: Nordic Cooperation – The Swedish M96 in Finnish Service

Nordic Cooperation: The Swedish M96 in Finnish Service

 

One of the significant foreign rifles in Finnish service during the Winter War and Continuation War was the Swedish M96 Mauser. These rifles began arriving in Finland even before Finland’s independence, and in 1919 the Civil Guard was given ownership of 1,390 of them. The numbers increased slowly through individual purchases by Finnish sport shooters and Civil Guardsmen in the 1920s, but it was in 1940 that Finland arrange the purchase of a large number. In total, 77,000 more M96 rifles were bought from Sweden during the Winter War, plus about 8,000 more brought and left in Finland by men of the Swedish Volunteer Corps.

About 30,000 of these rifles were returned to Sweden in mid 1940, with the remainder staying in Finnish inventory until the early 1950s. In both the Winter War and Continuation War they saw significant combat service, with the Swedish volunteers, with Finnish forces in northern Finland, and with Costal Infantry and Coastal Artillery units fighting in the south. When they were finally surplussed by Finland in the 50s, they were repurchased by Sweden, overhauled, and put back into service. The Finnish examples found today on the US collector market can be identified by their “SA” Finnish property stamps and (usually) Swedish single-screw stock disks.

9 Hole Reviews Taking the M96 to the 1000-Yard Range:

C&Rsenal History of the Swedish M94 Carbine:

C&Rsenal History of the Swedish M96 Rifle: