The Legend of Lieutenant-Colonel Mike Hoare

I remember reading Congo Mercenary while deployed many moons back.

This guy was the stuff of legend.

Europe Renaissance

Mercenary ‘Mad Mike’ Hoare (1919-2022) was perhaps the best-known of the European mercenaries who fought in the Congo Crisis (1960-1965).  Born to Irish parents in Calcutta he was educated in England. A rarity for mercenaries who spend their lives on the frontlines, Hoare, at 101 years old seemingly benefited from the unstinting devotion of a very special and caring guardian angel. A veteran of numerous conflicts, Mike Hoare earned his spurs as an officer in the London Irish Rifles.

What does an army captain do when World War II becomes history? He becomes a chartered accountant of course. When led by Europeans prosperous and peaceful South Africa was a magnet for many disenchanted Britons. Mike Hoare was no exception. The amiable demobbed Brit set up a charted accountant’s business in South Africa.

As a South African citizen, Mike Hoare combined his sense of adventure and soldierly know-how to organise safaris…

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The Carver Technique

Pistol Fundamentals Flashback: Jeff Copper and the Modern Technique

H/T Lenny Ladner

 

 

No other man in firearms training history has had more influence and persuasion that Colonel Jeff Cooper, USMC (Ret.)

The Modern Technique of Pistol Craft that Colonel Cooper invented and taught revolutionized Handgun Training forever.

The MT can be divided up into four major parts:

1. The Big-Bore Autoloading Pistol

Cooper favored this pistol for its proven fight-stopping characteristics, its ease of handling, and the ability to reload it very quickly. While he personally preferred the Colt 1911 in .45 ACP, he also gave the nod to the CZ-75, the Browning Hi-Power and a few other guns. He was not a big fan of the 9 mm, however, and called double-action semi-auto pistols the answer to an unasked question.

2. The Weaver Stance

Cooper borrowed this technique from Deputy Sheriff Jack Weaver, who was consistently beating them all in the combat matches. It is a balanced combat stance that uses a two-hand, isometric hold on the handgun. The shooting hand pushes forward and the support hand pulls back. It is the key to fast, multiple shots using full-power ammunition.

Since the MT was developed over 40 years ago, there have been a myriad of other shooting stances developed that are worth checking out.

3. The Flash Sight Picture

Early on, Col. Jeff Cooper realized that when shooters focused on their front sights, their number of center hits went up dramatically. He also realized that, at close range, you really don’t have to carefully line up both the front and rear sight, nor do you have the time to do it in a gunfight. Just get the front sight on the target as quickly as possible, see the front sight clearly, and launch your shot. The effectiveness of this technique is amazing.

4. The Surprise Break

Cooper taught his students to press the trigger instead of giving it a healthy jerk that would throw the sights off target. In practice, one begins this technique very slowly, pressing gently until the shot is launched. Done properly, the shot should come as almost a surprise. With further practice, one learns to compress all the right moves and deliver his shot quickly and accurately. The combination of No. 3 and No. 4 is why you hear instructors admonish their students with “Front sight, Press.  Front sight, Press.”

 

News Piece from 1979 on Cooper and Gunsite Academy.

 

Jeff Cooper’s Handgun Fundamentals Instructional Video (1985)

 

Low-Tech to No-Tech is The Way

Analog all the way!
Paper don’t need batteries.

Tactical Wisdom

Being a public figure in the preparedness world, I get swamped with people asking me for my recommendations on the latest and coolest cool-guy Ultra-Tacticool gear. Which night vision should I buy, what’s the best range finder, and what rifle accessories do I need top the list.

While I give the best answers I can (and I’ll try to here), I always wonder if they’ve even read my first book, the Baseline Training Manual, where I spell out my philosophy on this. My philosophy is to go with no or low-tech options, every time. Technology is a point of failure. You’ll need batteries or repairs, so the answer is to learn to do without. You don’t need the $375 ultra-light backpacking tent; you need a tarp and some para-cord.

This is what the Lord says: “Stand at the crossroads and look; ask for the ancient paths, ask where the good way…

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The Last Valley

H/T WRSA